Author Topic: Out of Town Ballparks  (Read 22044 times)

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Offline wj73

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Re: Out of Town Ballparks
« Reply #200: February 21, 2024, 08:18:54 PM »
Heading up to NYC in April to catch Marlins at NYY on the 10th, and KC at Mets on the 12th, with tix for Spamalot on the 11th. We’ve been to the old Yankees and Mets ballparks, but have not yet seen the new ones.


We have our Amtrak and hotel reservations, and our Spamalot tix, but haven’t purchased the baseball tix yet. We were looking at SeatGeek and StubHub and it seems that there are tix available. We picked these dates on purpose as we figured there would be less interest by local fans for seeing either the Marlins or KC.


Any one been to either ballpark? Comments? Suggestions?  Our hotel is near Times Square, and we plan on taking the subway to both ballparks.

Offline Senatorswin

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Re: Out of Town Ballparks
« Reply #201: February 21, 2024, 09:22:47 PM »
Heading up to NYC in April to catch Marlins at NYY on the 10th, and KC at Mets on the 12th, with tix for Spamalot on the 11th. We’ve been to the old Yankees and Mets ballparks, but have not yet seen the new ones.


We have our Amtrak and hotel reservations, and our Spamalot tix, but haven’t purchased the baseball tix yet. We were looking at SeatGeek and StubHub and it seems that there are tix available. We picked these dates on purpose as we figured there would be less interest by local fans for seeing either the Marlins or KC.


Any one been to either ballpark? Comments? Suggestions?  Our hotel is near Times Square, and we plan on taking the subway to both ballparks.

I've been to both. It's good you're staying in Times Square for the Mets game. We stayed near the Mets stadium and wasn't sure my car was going to be there the next morning. We also had an issue with a motorcycle gang. The Mets stadium is fine but nothing special. It's just there. We went on a bobblehead night, I can't remember who the bobblehead was, but just inside the stadium somebody was buying them so they could resell them. We made a nice bank on them. So we had a very nice time at the Mets but again nothing stood out.

We stayed near Times Square for the Yankees stadium visit. The nice thing about that is we took the subway right to the stadium. Very nice. The bad thing is I didn't like the stadium at all. They made a mistake by trying to make it like the old stadium. If you walk around the concourse the outfield is completely closed in. You can't see the field. I didn't like anything about the new Yankee Stadium. I like stadiums that are open like Nats Park.

I hope you have fun. I am jealous.

Offline Senatorswin

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Re: Out of Town Ballparks
« Reply #202: February 21, 2024, 09:27:21 PM »
I forgot to mention you can take the number 7 train to the Mets stadium so that's a plus also.

Offline varoadking

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Re: Out of Town Ballparks
« Reply #203: February 21, 2024, 09:38:23 PM »
The Mets ballpark felt like a dungeon.  We sat in the lower level roughly across from third base.  The left field seating so high, feels like you are walled in.
Planes are constantly landing from right field towards center field...low and loud.
We stayed in Times Square and took a black car back...they lined up behind right field...across the street from the auto scrapyard.
OK for a one time deal...I'd never go back.  This was maybe 10-ish years ago...

Offline machpost

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Re: Out of Town Ballparks
« Reply #204: February 22, 2024, 08:14:48 AM »
We last went to a game at Citi Field in 2016. I thought it was fine. We had lower level seats that gave us access to the club area and the concessions were better than at Nats Park. But I just looked on Google Street View and was surprised that those chop shops still line one side of the ballpark. It's a weird juxtaposition. Imagine if Nats Park had been dropped into Navy Yard, but all the run down warehouses around it just remained in operation like nothing ever happened.

Offline wj73

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Re: Out of Town Ballparks
« Reply #205: February 22, 2024, 12:47:26 PM »
Thanks for all the insights. Makes me very interested to see both ballparks. I will definitely report back after the trip.


When visiting a new ballpark, we usually try to get upper deck seats behind home - essentially as close as we can get to the view from the press box. We’ve found that’s a good place to get an overview of the entire ballpark, the sight lines, any views beyond the ballpark, and a general feel for the ballpark. We can also scout out seats that we might want to get should we get a chance to return there some day.

Offline Ali the Baseball Cat

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Re: Out of Town Ballparks
« Reply #206: February 22, 2024, 02:33:58 PM »
The "John Rocker Express"
I forgot to mention you can take the number 7 train to the Mets stadium so that's a plus also.

Offline JCA-CrystalCity

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Re: Out of Town Ballparks
« Reply #207: February 22, 2024, 02:51:11 PM »
When visiting a new ballpark, we usually try to get upper deck seats behind home - essentially as close as we can get to the view from the press box.
you'll be able to read the numbers on the tails of the planes landing at LaGuardia

Offline wj73

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Re: Out of Town Ballparks
« Reply #208: April 14, 2024, 12:51:10 PM »
Just back from a trip to NYC where we took in games at Yankee Stadium and CitiField. We stayed in The Marriott Element on 39th Street, across from the Port Authority Terminal. It was our first time there, but will return. The staff was extremely friendly, the room came with a small kitchenette, there’s a free hot breakfast in the morning, and every evening there’s a free Happy Hour, serving beer and wine, and a selection of bread, cheeses, and olives. The rooms are small, as is the norm in NYC, and it’s an older building, so the 3 elevators could get a bit slow and crowded at busy times.

As for the ballparks, Yankee Stadium and CitiField both opened in 2009, but they couldn’t feel more different. Yankee Stadium feels older than 2009, and CitiField feels younger.

Yankee Stadium

Yankee Stadium’s concourses seemed narrow and dark, and the signage was poor. We had to ask a couple of staff how to get to our seats.

Monument Park is smaller than the Monument Park in old Yankee Stadium, and they’ve set up a serpentine walking line where you file in and are guided to walk in front to see the first set of retired numbers and plaques, then make a u-turn turn and walk by the middle numbers and plaques then u-turn again to walk along the back where the larger monuments are. The ushers in this area tell people to keep moving along the line. Lingering is definitely not encouraged.

We’d bought tix for the 3rd level behind home, in something called the Jim Beam Suite. The seats are regular seats, but nicely padded, and the sections are smaller. The Suite itself is located across the concourse and is sort of a large private club, which only people in the Jim Beam sections can access. I think it was limited to Sections 317-321. It has a private bar, private concession stands, and private bathrooms, and plenty of table seating.  There’s also free popcorn and peanuts.  Outside the Suite in the concourse, there’s a large area roped off with comfortable lounge chair type seating, accessible only to Suite ticket holders.

It was a very chilly night, and we were glad to be able to relax in the warmth of the Suite before the game, and to retreat to it in the middle of the game for a quick warmup. It was also nice at the end of the game to hit the bathroom with no line, in preparation for our subway ride back to our hotel.

We picked up our 2nd row aisle tix on StubHub for $56 each (including fees). I think they run just north of $100 at the box office. Even at full price, I think the access to the Suite is worth it.

Although our seats were on Level 3, they were quite high - the equivalent of 4th level seats at Nats Park and most other ballparks.

The scoreboard is enormous, stretching across the entire outfield almost from foul pole to foul pole. Lots and lots of info going by all game. For instance, for each pitch, you not only get pitch type and speed, but it shows percentage of horizontal and vertical break. The out of town scoreboard lists all the games and scores, then highlights each in turn, with a line or two about each game. It was informational, but at times, distracting having so much info.

The crowd LOVES Soto. He received his Silver Slugger award before the game, and the crowd went wild. Each time he came to bat, there were loud enthusiastic cheers. I think the fact that Judge is struggling a bit to begin the season has contributed to the Soto-mania. New kid in town, and all that.

Basic draft beer was about $18 a pop. Everything else was also in the higher price range.

All in all, I just didn’t care for this version of Yankee Stadium. The Jim Beam Suite seats were comfortable, with padded seats and seat backs. And it was great to see Soto again, although jarring to see him in pinstripes. But somehow the ballpark just left me cold, although I’d have a hard time explaining exactly why. It just did. Not a ballpark I’m in any hurry to return to.

Next up - CitiField

Offline wj73

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Re: Out of Town Ballparks
« Reply #209: April 14, 2024, 12:55:44 PM »
CitiField

It’s a long but easy ride out the Number 7 subway line to get to CitiField. The subway opens directly out to the main plaza in front of The Rotunda. The Home Run Apple from Shea is there, as is a large statue of Tom Seaver, who, oddly enough, only has two arms.

After the mandatory selfie in front of the Apple, we walked into The Rotunda entrance. What a lovely space to enter a ballpark! A bright, airy space with a rounded high ceiling. The escalators are in front of you, and the team store is tucked away in the back. A quote from Jackie Robinson circles the wall. It’s bright and cheerful, and is a great way to start a ball field experience.

We took the escalator to the main level, and walked the entire concourse. The concourse is wide and bright, with lots of different concession stands. There are cute touches, like a “Shea Bridge” you walk across as you circle the concourse.

From there, we followed the excellent signage to the elevator to access our 3rd level Club Seats. Their Club Level is much like the Nats Park Club Level, except it’s much wider, allowing for many more seating options. Lots of regular tables and high bar-style tables, plus a large bright area of comfy plush chairs and sofa seating groups. A full bar runs the entire length of the back, plus several concession stands are tucked here and there. I liked the fact that because of the design, you didn’t have a constant stream of people passing from one area to the next like you do at Nats Park. People came there to sit and relax there, not to pass through from one area to the next. Attendance was only about 20K the night we were there, so maybe it might feel less relaxed on a more crowded night, but I think the layout mitigates against that. As you can tell, I really liked this Club Level.

Our seats were second row aisle seats in Section 319, directly behind home. We picked them up on StubHub for $58 each, including fees. They were directly below the press box, and were of a normal height for 300 level seats. The seats were padded, but not the backs.

Draft beer ran about $17 a pop, still expensive but a buck cheaper than Yankee Stadium. Other concessions were similarly priced.

The scoreboard is large, but not gigantic like Yankee Stadium. It had standard scoreboard features, but not the extensive ones like tracking the horizontal and verticals break of each pitch.

As with Yankee Stadium, the crowd was very involved. A nice thing I saw was when Lindor came to bat. He’s been struggling at the plate, and was batting about .100. When he was announced, the crowd gave him an enthusiastic standing ovation. I asked some nearby fans why they did that, and they said it was to encourage and support him. I liked that kind of fan support. I think at Yankee Stadium he’d have been booed.

Bottom line is I liked CitiField a lot. It seems much newer than 2009. The whole ballpark seemed bright and cheerful. The scoreboard gave me all the info I needed, without being so big as to distract from the play on the field like the Yankee Stadium scoreboard did. The seats were comfortable and not too high up, and the staff was amazingly friendly. I must say they did have the hardest Find-the-Ball scoreboard Hat Game I’ve ever seen.

I would definitely return to CitiField if I get a chance.