Author Topic: Computer help (breakout from Nationals @ Guardians, Game 3)  (Read 624 times)

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Offline dracnal

  • Posts: 1699
Everything I read and hear makes me more paranoid and depressed about having to get a new computer.

I'll admit I've hit the point where I'm less concerned about privacy because I have zero expectations of it. GDPR is definitely nice and it did change how things happen here, but largely by adding a 'Do you want to accept cookies?' prompt. If you say yes, you get everything. If you pick 'Let me see the settings' it'll default to necessary only. I know most folks don't bother with the extra step so it didn't change a ton for us in the States. I used to go hang out with friends every Saturday night. Never entered it as an appointment, never put it in the GPS, but after a few weeks, my phone would start alerting me about 30 mins before I'd leave to let me know there was more traffic than usual.

Those store discount cards like Safeway and Giant use get them more net profit than most of the groceries actually do. A friend of ours didn't want her own card, so she used ours to give us gas rewards points. She moved to Denver and had a pregnancy scare at one point shortly after arriving.  She bought a test at Safeway. Five months later we started to receive samples of diapers and coupons for various baby products in our mailbox.

I do think that turning off the telemetry service is a good idea, even if it's just to save some CPU cycles. Copilot is tied in heavily to Microsoft's use of virtual assistant and AI search results from Bing. It's okay to remove it, but you'll definitely see less function from the AI bots. If that's your preference, go for it. If you don't mind the thing sending you an alert about a delayed flight because a friend emailed you a flight number and arrival time, I think the barnyard animal is well past the gate at this point so closing it is likely moot. It is definitely an aggressive tracker. So is signing into Chrome with a google account. Or having an Alexa in your house.

Unfortunately modern conveniences and cool tech tricks are almost always tied one to one to harvesting info off of you and selling it to third parties. Europe definitely has better protections, but we pretty well cater to the tech companies in the States.

Offline English Natsie

  • Posts: 550
  • It's baseball, Jim, but not as we know it...
No need to be depressed - you are free to manage your set-up to cater to your needs. I will freely admit to being a privacy and performance extremist - my PC, OS, router (hardware and firmware) and browser (inc DNS resolver) are all heavily modified to maximize both. But that's just my thing - I suspect you won't have encountered many other overclockers, for example. And I like to minimize the prospect of Big Tech profiting by monetizing my data. But everything has limits, so just settle upon whatever you feel comfy with. For example, if you wanted to have ultimate privacy, then you'd disable referrers in your browser - but then virtually every website would stop working. Private, yes, but also completely impracticable. Equally, you'd disable Widevine (potential Google snooping) - but then you wouldn't be able to stream very much as virtually all streaming sites are underpinned by Widevine. You'll soon find what's right for you.

In terms of hardware, CPU performance is king, so go for the best you can afford, even at the cost of losing some of the bells and whistles. Faster RAM would be a benefit if you do lots of photo processing, or are graphics hungry. Small tech note - given your requirements, don't be drawn into paying extra for a 'K' suffix CPU; you don't need it. (The K suffix indicates that the CPU is unlocked, so all settings can be modified - great if you're an overclocker, but not needed otherwise).

Offline English Natsie

  • Posts: 550
  • It's baseball, Jim, but not as we know it...
Europe definitely has better protections, but we pretty well cater to the tech companies in the States.

It's really a question of regulatory attitude - European regulators think that users should have to opt-in to greater data harvesting, whereas in the US regulators think users should opt-out of data harvesting. The Europeans would claim that that puts all of the onus on the user, to be tech knowledgable enough to know how, and from what, to opt-out.

Here's a link to the privacy rights group NOYB ('None Of Your Business') - https://noyb.eu/en

Offline English Natsie

  • Posts: 550
  • It's baseball, Jim, but not as we know it...
Better than nothing - but I'd still go for uninstalling... ;)

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/articles/cd11rje1mrro