Author Topic: The Former Nationals Watch (2022)  (Read 2357 times)

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Offline Senatorswin

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Re: The Former Nationals Watch (2022)
« Reply #75: May 18, 2022, 08:33:52 PM »
Jim Riggleman has been hired as the new manager of the Billings Mustangs of the Pioneer League

What a mistake this guy made. I think he was reacting to an article in the paper that said he was just a placeholder manager until they were ready to contend. He was a good manager but after he pulled this bonehead move, I think baseball people thinks he deserted the Nats and now he hasn't been able to get a big league manager job ever since.

Offline Elvir Ovcina

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Re: The Former Nationals Watch (2022)
« Reply #76: May 18, 2022, 10:15:52 PM »
Scherzer injured.

Online Slateman

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Re: The Former Nationals Watch (2022)
« Reply #77: May 18, 2022, 10:18:08 PM »
Max's back locked up

Offline Elvir Ovcina

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Re: The Former Nationals Watch (2022)
« Reply #78: May 18, 2022, 10:50:01 PM »
Checking in on Nick Pivetta: 0-4. 7.84 ERA, 1.84 WHIP, after today's start.

Now 2-4, 4.22, 1.15 after throwing a 2 hitter.


Offline machpost

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Re: The Former Nationals Watch (2022)
« Reply #80: May 19, 2022, 01:26:25 PM »
Max left his start early.

https://www.espn.com/mlb/story/_/id/33941878/new-york-mets-max-scherzer-pulls-start-apparent-injury

Karma for snubbing the Japanese ambassador? Karma for signing such a ridiculous contract with the Mets? Probably just time catching up with him, actually. He was showing signs of slowing down a bit toward the end of his last season here, if I remember correctly.

Offline Elvir Ovcina

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Re: The Former Nationals Watch (2022)
« Reply #81: May 19, 2022, 02:43:32 PM »
Karma for snubbing the Japanese ambassador? Karma for signing such a ridiculous contract with the Mets? Probably just time catching up with him, actually. He was showing signs of slowing down a bit toward the end of his last season here, if I remember correctly.

He was 7-0 with a sub-2 ERA in Los Angeles and he's 5-1, 2.54 this year.  Doesn't seem to be catching him too fast.

Offline Natsinpwc

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Re: The Former Nationals Watch (2022)
« Reply #82: May 19, 2022, 02:51:11 PM »
He was 7-0 with a sub-2 ERA in Los Angeles and he's 5-1, 2.54 this year.  Doesn't seem to be catching him too fast.
Well 6-8 weeks karma anyway.  He also could no go in the postseason last year when the Dodgers needed him. 

https://www.mlb.com/news/max-scherzer-has-oblique-injury

Offline imref

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Re: The Former Nationals Watch (2022)
« Reply #83: May 19, 2022, 02:53:00 PM »
Oblique strain. Max is out 6-8 weeks

Offline Elvir Ovcina

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Re: The Former Nationals Watch (2022)
« Reply #84: May 19, 2022, 03:35:44 PM »
Oblique strain. Max is out 6-8 weeks

Odds he's back before Strasburg?

Offline Natsinpwc

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Re: The Former Nationals Watch (2022)
« Reply #85: May 19, 2022, 03:44:02 PM »
Odds he's back before Strasburg?
Short odds. Very very short.

Offline Senatorswin

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Re: The Former Nationals Watch (2022)
« Reply #86: May 19, 2022, 04:22:36 PM »
I'm not surprised Max is out. The fact he couldn't go in that game in the playoffs last year was a hint things might be catching up with his body. After a winters rest he came out blazing this year but I suspect these three years with the Mets will be littered with IL stints.

Offline welch

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Re: The Former Nationals Watch (2022)
« Reply #87: May 19, 2022, 05:42:13 PM »
Oblique strain. Max is out 6-8 weeks

From The Athletic:

Quote
New York Mets starter Max Scherzer will miss six to eight weeks after an MRI showed Thursday he has a moderate to high grade internal oblique strain. Scherzer left Wednesday's game against the St. Louis Cardinals during the middle of Albert Pujols' at-bat in the sixth inning due to left side discomfort.

“I don’t think this is a major strain,” Scherzer said after the game. “But I’ve never had a left side injury before. So when I felt it, I just knew there was no way you could throw another pitch. So, just get out of there.”

After throwing an 85 mph slider in the dirt, Scherzer signaled to the dugout, making a slashing motion in front of his throat, seeming to indicate that his night was over. Manager Buck Showalter and trainer Joe Golia immediately came out to check on Scherzer. Scherzer threw 87 pitches before his departure.

From a different article in The Athletic, one titled "The Mets’ nightmare scenario? It surfaced when Max Scherzer pulled himself out against the Cardinals"

Quote
The Mets’ possible nightmare scenario comes with Jacob deGrom still on the 60-day injured list and seeking to return from a stress reaction in his scapula that surfaced in the spring and with right-hander Tylor Megill on the injured list with a bout of biceps tendinitis. The Mets, 25-14, have weathered the storm in remarkable fashion, racing to the best record in the National League East, and they continued their streak of resilience Wednesday night, battering the Cardinals before and after Scherzer’s exit.

Online Ali the Baseball Cat

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Re: The Former Nationals Watch (2022)
« Reply #88: May 20, 2022, 11:52:56 AM »
Cano must know some powerful Haitian oungans back home...

Online Ali the Baseball Cat

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Re: The Former Nationals Watch (2022)
« Reply #89: May 23, 2022, 12:58:15 PM »
Le sigh

Swaggy T: Trea Turner was a five-tool player, then he added a sixth that made him a sensation

https://www.latimes.com/sports/dodgers/story/2022-05-23/trea-turner-smoothest-slide-in-mlb-dodgers?fbclid=IwAR2y0DBaIut6WRfZGO867KvxQ4Z4qLlyoh9L5HdQ4qVFI3qmFQlbakmX8Nk

Last August, Trea Turner, less than a month into his Dodgers career, scored from second base against the Philadelphia Phillies and slid into internet lore.

His work of art went unnoticed initially. The Dodgers’ broadcasters, rightfully so, marveled at the fact that most Major League Baseball players wouldn’t have scored from second base on that play. Will Smith clubbed a single to right field. Bryce Harper, the eventual National League MVP, wasn’t playing deep and fired an accurate throw home. But Turner scored anyway. It was an important scamper, giving the Dodgers a 2-0 lead in a 5-0 win.

Within minutes, though, the sprint was a footnote to the dash’s swaggy ending.

Turner’s slide home was buttery smooth. Oil-slick smooth. Stupid smooth. He went with his right foot leading the way over the left side of home plate. He bent his left leg underneath and stuck out his gloved left hand. He swiped the white slab of rubber, glided a few more feet, and popped up with a spin just ahead of Phillies catcher J.T. Realmuto’s tag. It all happened so quickly, so effortlessly with a composed flair.

The clip went viral by the end of the night. It was a GIF by the morning. MLB’s YouTube account asked if it was the smoothest slide of all time.

Turner has emerged as one of the top players in the majors, a dynamic talent expected to break the bank in free agency this winter. He was a top-five NL MVP vote-getter last year. He’s arguably the fastest player in the majors. And he’s — unofficially — the league’s best slider.

Turner, 28, has replicated the slick act a few more times since August, each instance adding to a niche highlight reel. But he didn’t begin his baseball-on-ice routine in Los Angeles.

He said he doesn’t know when he added the slick slide to his arsenal, but his teammates at North Carolina State, in the minor leagues and with the Washington Nationals all noticed his unusual skill before the Dodgers acquired him at last July’s trade deadline. The shortstop recalled posting a compilation of highlights on his Instagram a few years ago that sparked a reaction from friends.

“I literally do the same slide like 15 times in the video,” said Turner, who returns to Washington this week for the first time since he was traded.

The difference, Turner noted, is the uniform he has worn since last summer.

In Los Angeles, as a Dodger, those moments are magnified. And the baseball version of a moonwalk has shined in Hollywood. Last month, a six-minute video of Turner’s “smoothest slides” was published on YouTube. It had about 215,000 views as of Sunday. Turner has taken a mundane move performed dozens of times over nine innings — and made it cool. He says he’s not going for that.

Turner said he has never practiced sliding into bases in his life. He thinks his athleticism and coordination allow for the slick routines. But, ultimately, his ability is instinctual with a reasonable motive: avoiding pain. More players, Turner noted, hurt themselves sliding into bases more than people think. They slide too close to the bag, jamming their foot or, worse, injuring their hand. Or, less often, too far away. Or they slam too hard on to the ground, leaving bruises and raspberries. The wear-and-tear accumulates over a season, over multiple years, and impacts careers. He makes it look easy because he wants it to be easy on his body.

“It’s good,” Turner said, “but it’s more so it’s not looking like a car crash is happening.”

Dino Ebel had a front-row seat to one of Turner’s recent friction-free landings last month. It happened on Jackie Robinson Day against the Cincinnati Reds at Dodger Stadium. That time, Turner coasted into third base. Ebel, the Dodgers’ third base coach, was standing right there. But he was busy looking up, doing his job, so he didn’t notice Turner’s slide. It wasn’t until he watched the video after the game that he realized Turner had pulled another one off.

“He’s, like, the best, for me,” Ebel said. “He’s so fast. He’s so light on his feet. When he slides, I don’t even hear him.”

Ebel said Turner’s intuitiveness, derived from wreaking havoc on the bases at every level, is unmatched, allowing for the smooth landings. He knows when to slide, how far he needs to be to not only make it safely but ensure he doesn’t get off the bag.

“It’s not talked about much, but there’s definitely an art to it,” said Dodgers manager Dave Roberts, whose baserunning ability fueled his 10-year playing career. “It’s part of being a complete baserunner.”

Then there’s the speed. Statistically, Turner’s sprint speed of 30.1 feet per second this season was tied for third in the majors entering Sunday, according to Baseball Savant. He leads the major leagues with 30 bolts — defined as any run where the sprint speed reaches 30 feet per second. For the old-school stat heads, he has eight steals in nine attempts.

Ebel said Turner is the fastest player he has coached in the majors. Mike Trout and Peter Bourjos, players he coached with the Angels, are next on the list. Trout, Ebel said, is a different kind of runner. He’s loud. Bourjos was lighter. But not as light as Turner.

Elliott Avent, Turner’s coach at North Carolina State, had a nickname for his star shortstop: Seabiscuit, after the legendary race horse from the 1930s. Avent recalled Turner scoring so quickly in an ACC championship game that the umpire didn’t watch the play so he called Turner out without noticing what happened.

“His slides are poetry in motion,” Avent said. “When he runs, it’s like his feet don’t hit the ground. It’s like watching a deer run through the woods. It’s like his hooves are hardly hitting the ground.”

Turner said knowing good slides from bad ones is easy. Not necessarily from a smoothness standpoint, but whether the slide slowed down the runner. His famous feet-first pop-up slide, when executed properly, seemingly eliminates any friction. It gives him an edge. There isn’t another one quite like it.

Offline imref

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Re: The Former Nationals Watch (2022)
« Reply #90: May 23, 2022, 01:39:02 PM »
still feels like we got Gray and Ruiz for Turner, and the rest of the haul for Max. So far the trade has been good for both sides.

Online nfotiu

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Re: The Former Nationals Watch (2022)
« Reply #91: May 23, 2022, 03:40:38 PM »
Turner is not playing that great. 

It's tough to separate the two when it comes to the trade.   I tend to think Max for a playoff run was the higher value and Turner just sweetened the return.

Offline welch

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Re: The Former Nationals Watch (2022)
« Reply #92: May 23, 2022, 04:21:10 PM »
still feels like we got Gray and Ruiz for Turner, and the rest of the haul for Max. So far the trade has been good for both sides.

The rest of the haul has been useless. Casey hitting about .210 in AAA with many strikeouts and not much power. Carillo is hurt and has not done well since the Nats got him.

Casey: https://www.milb.com/player/donovan-casey-661541

Carillo: https://www.milb.com/player/gerardo-carrillo-672629

Offline UMDNats

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Re: The Former Nationals Watch (2022)
« Reply #93: May 23, 2022, 04:38:04 PM »
The trade was Gray & Ruiz, a AAAA outfielder and a lotto ticket for Max & Trea. You really can't separate them too much as we're not getting both Gray and Ruiz for only Max or only Trea.

More and more it's proven to be a fine trade. Casey will probably make the big league club this year for a stretch and Carillo's future was always a potential good reliever, which he can still easily do. So far Gray and Ruiz have  been more than excellent.

Offline Elvir Ovcina

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Re: The Former Nationals Watch (2022)
« Reply #94: May 23, 2022, 04:39:45 PM »
Turner is not playing that great. 

It's tough to separate the two when it comes to the trade.   I tend to think Max for a playoff run was the higher value and Turner just sweetened the return.

I think of it more as Scherzer was about last year, Turner about this one.  Turner allowed them to not need to pay Seager. 

Also, his "not that great" right now would be a 4-WAR season if he keeps it up.  It's pretty damn good for a shortstop.  It's not that great for a guy who led MLB in batting average and finished 5th in the MVP race last year, true, but he's hitting better than Seager and for $10 million less.


Online Ali the Baseball Cat

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Re: The Former Nationals Watch (2022)
« Reply #96: May 27, 2022, 12:24:23 PM »
Adrian Sanchez eating 10.5 cheez steaks in a single day should make every Nats fan swell with pride

Offline welch

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Re: The Former Nationals Watch (2022)
« Reply #97: May 27, 2022, 02:46:51 PM »
Having watched Trea again, I'll repeat. In 2015, a Boston senior guy -- Frank Wren, but I didn't ask his name -- told me "Trea Turner is the best prospect I ever scouted".

It is sad to see him playing for any team but the Nats, but he plays the exact same way we saw all those seasons. Good luck to him.

Offline imref

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Re: The Former Nationals Watch (2022)
« Reply #98: June 02, 2022, 03:16:54 PM »
Harper dealing with right forearm soreness.  Seems like it's only a matter of time before they bite the bullet and send him for TJ.

Offline welch

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Re: The Former Nationals Watch (2022)
« Reply #99: June 04, 2022, 10:56:49 PM »
The trade was Gray & Ruiz, a AAAA outfielder and a lotto ticket for Max & Trea. You really can't separate them too much as we're not getting both Gray and Ruiz for only Max or only Trea.

More and more it's proven to be a fine trade. Casey will probably make the big league club this year for a stretch and Carillo's future was always a potential good reliever, which he can still easily do. So far Gray and Ruiz have  been more than excellent.

Casey is a AA outfielder, hitting .213 in AAA at age 26. Carillo is still hurt. Gray and Ruiz are pretty good major leaguers, but that's all the Nats got in the trade.

In the other flippage, the Nats got Riley Adams and several nobodies.