Author Topic: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)  (Read 1914 times)

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Offline DCFan

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)
« Reply #100: March 30, 2021, 01:06:07 PM »
Shoppers tip - Aldi has the best deli turkey breast around. It's $2.99 for half a pound. Delicious and cheap and tastes like it was just carved. :cheers:

Offline Ali the Baseball Cat

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)
« Reply #101: March 30, 2021, 08:11:08 PM »
Our corner bodega sells Aldi stuff at a markup...I shall check it out  :D

Offline 1995hoo

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)
« Reply #102: April 19, 2021, 10:25:29 AM »
I made this last night with the modifications noted below it brackets. Very good. It had been a few years since I'd last made this and I think I should make it more often. This came from a magazine at some point and I believe it is a Steven Raichlen recipe. I didn't bother cutting up the chicken and making kebabs; I just cooked the whole boneless chicken breasts as they were.

1½ tablespoons Aleppo pepper or 2 teaspoons dried crushed red pepper plus 2 tablespoons Hungarian sweet paprika, plus additional Aleppo pepper or paprika for sprinkling [I used the paprika option]
1 cup plain whole-milk Greek-style yogurt  (8 ounces) [I used two four-ounce containers of lemon-flavored Siggi's skyr]
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
2 tablespoons tomato paste [I skipped this because we didn't have any]
2 teaspoons coarse kosher salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
6 garlic cloves, peeled, flattened
2 unpeeled lemons; 1 thinly sliced into rounds, 1 cut into wedges for serving [I skipped this in favor of using the lemon-flavored skyr]
2¼ pounds skinless boneless chicken (thighs and/or breast halves), cut into 1¼-inch cubes [we used breasts and I didn't bother cutting them up]
Flat metal skewers [I skipped skewers]

If using Aleppo pepper, place in large bowl and mix in 1 tablespoon warm water. Let stand until thick paste forms, about 5 minutes. If using dried crushed red pepper and paprika combination, place in large bowl and stir in 2 tablespoons warm water and let stand until paste forms, about 5 minutes.

Add yogurt, olive oil, red wine vinegar, tomato paste, 2 teaspoons coarse salt, and 1 teaspoon black pepper to spice mixture in bowl; whisk to blend. Stir in garlic and lemon slices, then chicken. Cover and chill at least 1 hour. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Keep chilled.)

Prepare grill (medium-high heat). Thread chicken pieces on metal skewers, dividing evenly. Discard marinade in bowl. Sprinkle each skewer with salt, pepper, and additional Aleppo pepper or paprika. Brush grill rack with oil. Grill chicken until golden brown and cooked through, turning skewers occasionally, 10 to 12 minutes total. Transfer skewers to platter. Surround with lemon wedges and serve.

Offline bluestreak

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)
« Reply #103: April 19, 2021, 10:45:52 AM »
What is this called. It reminds me of what I use for Chicken tikka masala except it uses Aleppo pepper instead of Garam masala and turmeric. I love Aleppo pepper though and want to give this a try.

Online HalfSmokes

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)
« Reply #104: April 19, 2021, 10:50:47 AM »
What is this called. It reminds me of what I use for Chicken tikka masala except it uses Aleppo pepper instead of Garam masala and turmeric. I love Aleppo pepper though and want to give this a try.

If you live anywhere near Alexandria, the Mediterranean market on Telegraph has great Aleppo pepper (and pretty much another middle eastern, North African or greek spice you'd want) for not very much

Offline 1995hoo

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)
« Reply #105: April 19, 2021, 12:51:15 PM »
What is this called. It reminds me of what I use for Chicken tikka masala except it uses Aleppo pepper instead of Garam masala and turmeric. I love Aleppo pepper though and want to give this a try.

The MS Word file in which I have the recipe saved says "Yogurt-marinated chicken kebabs with Aleppo pepper."

A Google search for that phrase and "Steven Raichlen" reveals it came from the July 2009 issue of Bon Appetit magazine: https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/yogurt-marinated-chicken-kebabs-with-aleppo-pepper-353832



If you live anywhere near Alexandria, the Mediterranean market on Telegraph has great Aleppo pepper (and pretty much another middle eastern, North African or greek spice you'd want) for not very much

Where on Telegraph is that? The only Mediterranean market I know of is the one on Pickett Street in the shopping center where Home Depot and the Wigyul auto shop are, and I've never gotten around to looking for Aleppo pepper there. The ethnic grocery store I can picture on Telegraph is the Bestway Latin-American market just south of the Beltway.

Online HalfSmokes

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)
« Reply #106: April 19, 2021, 01:23:47 PM »
That’s the one I was thinking of

Offline bluestreak

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)
« Reply #107: April 19, 2021, 01:31:34 PM »
The MS Word file in which I have the recipe saved says "Yogurt-marinated chicken kebabs with Aleppo pepper."

A Google search for that phrase and "Steven Raichlen" reveals it came from the July 2009 issue of Bon Appetit magazine: https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/yogurt-marinated-chicken-kebabs-with-aleppo-pepper-353832


Thanks. I love how this recipe treats Greek Yogurt as an exotic ingredient because it’s from so long ago.

Offline imref

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)
« Reply #108: April 20, 2021, 07:25:22 PM »
Anyone ever try a sustainable seafood subscription service like sizzlefish?

Offline imref

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)
« Reply #109: April 23, 2021, 01:35:31 PM »
Made my second of Rome's four pastas last night following this recipe but using bucatini instead of spaghetti, and pancetta instead of guanciali (which i've been unable to find).

https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/12965-spaghetti-carbonara

It came out a bit too runny at first, but letting it sit over low heat for a few minutes allowed it to thicken up. I didn't have it in Rome so I don't have anything to compare with, but it was a big hit with the family.  I'll definitely make it again.

Interesting tidbit - carbonara is relatively new to Italy, specifically Rome, where it became popular in the 1940s/50's. Legend has it that Italian cooks made it for American soldiers as a substitute for bacon and eggs.

Next up:Cacio e Pepe

Offline 1995hoo

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)
« Reply #110: April 23, 2021, 02:38:57 PM »
I can't view that because it wants me to log in, but we make carbonara fairly regularly. Ours isn't exactly "traditional" because we adjust a few things to our taste—we usually use American streaky bacon instead of pancetta or guanciale, and we usually cut up some cooked chicken and throw that into the bacon grease to heat up (makes the dish more filling), and then when we stir the pasta into the chicken and crumbled-up bacon the bacon grease flavors the pasta big time.

I certainly believe the bit about "a substitute for bacon and eggs" because I've often eaten leftover spaghetti carbonara for breakfast the following morning.

Offline imref

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)
« Reply #111: April 23, 2021, 04:11:42 PM »
I can't view that because it wants me to log in, but we make carbonara fairly regularly. Ours isn't exactly "traditional" because we adjust a few things to our taste—we usually use American streaky bacon instead of pancetta or guanciale, and we usually cut up some cooked chicken and throw that into the bacon grease to heat up (makes the dish more filling), and then when we stir the pasta into the chicken and crumbled-up bacon the bacon grease flavors the pasta big time.

I certainly believe the bit about "a substitute for bacon and eggs" because I've often eaten leftover spaghetti carbonara for breakfast the following morning.

We've done something similar before, adding chicken as well as basil and sliced grape tomatoes

here's the recipe from the NYT:

2  large eggs and 2 large yolks, room temperature
1  ounce (about 1/3 packed cup) grated pecorino Romano, plus additional for serving
1  ounce (about 1/3 packed cup) grated Parmesan
 Coarsely ground black pepper
1  tablespoon olive oil
3 ½  ounces of slab guanciale (see recipe), pancetta or bacon, sliced into pieces about 1/4 inch thick by 1/3 inch square
12  ounces spaghetti (about 3/4 box)

PREPARATION
Place a large pot of lightly salted water (no more than 1 tablespoon salt) over high heat, and bring to a boil. Fill a large bowl with hot water for serving, and set aside.
In a mixing bowl, whisk together the eggs, yolks and pecorino and Parmesan. Season with a pinch of salt and generous black pepper.
Set the water to boil. Meanwhile, heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat, add the pork, and sauté until the fat just renders, on the edge of crispness but not hard. Remove from heat and set aside.
Add pasta to the water and boil until a bit firmer than al dente. Just before pasta is ready, reheat guanciale in skillet, if needed. Reserve 1 cup of pasta water, then drain pasta and add to the skillet over low heat. Stir for a minute or so.
Empty serving bowl of hot water. Dry it and add hot pasta mixture. Stir in cheese mixture, adding some reserved pasta water if needed for creaminess. Serve immediately, dressing it with a bit of additional grated pecorino and pepper.

Offline KnorrForYourMoney

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)
« Reply #112: April 23, 2021, 11:31:34 PM »
The use of olive oil seems odd given how much rendered fat you're going to get out of guanciale/pancetta, anyway.  The rest of that is basically how I make carbonara, except I use bucatini instead of spaghetti.  Non-traditional, but I love the structure of bucatini in a dish like carbonara--extra sauce actually going inside the pasta itself = divinity.

Offline imref

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)
« Reply #113: April 24, 2021, 12:13:25 AM »
The use of olive oil seems odd given how much rendered fat you're going to get out of guanciale/pancetta, anyway.  The rest of that is basically how I make carbonara, except I use bucatini instead of spaghetti.  Non-traditional, but I love the structure of bucatini in a dish like carbonara--extra sauce actually going inside the pasta itself = divinity.
I didn’t use oil either, just the pancetta. And I used bucatini as well. Great stuff

Offline 1995hoo

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)
« Reply #114: April 24, 2021, 04:05:20 PM »
I’ve never tried bucatini with carbonara, but based on y’all’s comments I may have to do so next time if we have any in the cabinet.

Offline bluestreak

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)
« Reply #115: April 24, 2021, 04:30:18 PM »
I’ve never tried bucatini with carbonara, but based on y’all’s comments I may have to do so next time if we have any in the cabinet.

There was a bucatini shortage earlier this year I think.

Online JCA-CrystalCity

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)
« Reply #116: April 24, 2021, 04:54:04 PM »
I was walking by Coldstone's,and saw they were pushing peanut butter cookie dough as their special mix in.  I got inspired by the GEICO commercial and grabbed a small cup.

Offline imref

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)
« Reply #117: May 09, 2021, 11:21:52 AM »
Made shakshuka for the first time the wife for Mother’s Day, it is fantastic.

Recipe: https://downshiftology.com/recipes/shakshuka/

Offline 1995hoo

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)
« Reply #118: May 10, 2021, 11:49:54 AM »
My mom came over for Mother's Day dinner and I grilled some veal chops I got at the Springfield Butcher on Saturday:

2 large lemons
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1-1/2 tablespoons chopped fresh tarragon
4 loin veal chops, 10–12 oz each and 1 to 1-1/4 inches thick [I had three chops and they were about a pound each]
Salt and freshly ground pepper

Cut one of the lemons into 8 crosswise slices. Grate enough zest from the remaining lemon to yield 3/4 teaspoon, then squeeze 1 tablespoon juice. In a small bowl, combine the lemon zest and juice, oil, and chopped tarragon. Season the chops on both sides with salt and pepper, then brush with some of the lemon-tarragon mixture, reserving about 1 tablespoon of the mixture for the lemon slices. Let the chops stand at room temperature for 15 minutes, or cover and refrigerate for up to 3 hours. If refrigerated, remove from the refrigerator about 30 minutes before grilling.

Prepare a grill for direct grilling over medium-high and oil the grill rack. Grill the chops directly over the heat elements (gas) or the hottest part of the fire (charcoal) until nicely charred and cooked to your liking, 5–7 minutes per side for medium-rare [7 minutes was just right on my grill]. About 3 minutes before the veal is done, brush the lemon slices with the reserved lemon-tarragon mixture. Grill the lemon slices, turning once, until lightly charred and softened, 30–60 seconds per side.

Serve the veal chops with the grilled lemon slices.

(For side dishes, Ms1995hoo made twice-baked potatoes and also sauteed some asparagus, although I do not eat asparagus.)

Offline Ali the Baseball Cat

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)
« Reply #119: May 10, 2021, 01:40:11 PM »
:az:

Offline imref

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)
« Reply #120: May 10, 2021, 01:51:58 PM »
that looks good.

I got carried away a bit for Mother's Day. Instead of going out I decided to cook for the family.  I picked up a 4-pack of filet minions from BJs, dry aged them for a few days in the fridge, and cooked them in a cast iron pan in butter for 4 minutes a side before putting them in the oven for about 7 minutes. I served them with a peppercorn-cream-brandy-rosemary sauce.

For side dishes I just baked a few potatoes and roasted some Brussel sprouts that I first marinated in olive oil, lemon juice, salt, pepper, and garlic powder.

And as a special treat I made Robert Irvine's smoked pork belly Mac and cheese (https://chefirvine.com/recipes/smoked-pork-belly-mac-cheese-as-seen-on-restaurant-impossible). While it was fantastic, I didn't think it through - the recipe calls for two pounds of elbow macaroni, we only had four of us, so I've got enough Mac and Cheese left over to feed our neighbors. 

Offline Ali the Baseball Cat

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)
« Reply #121: May 10, 2021, 02:27:02 PM »
How have I never made (or for that matter, had) shakshuka??  This needs to be corrected, stat

Offline imref

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)
« Reply #122: May 10, 2021, 02:40:13 PM »
How have I never made (or for that matter, had) shakshuka??  This needs to be corrected, stat

I saw it on Alton Brown's new Good Eats a few months ago and got scared away, he made a very complex version that required first preserving lemons (https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/shakshuka-7424000), the recipe I posted above was really easy (and tasty).

Offline dracnal

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)
« Reply #123: May 10, 2021, 04:30:31 PM »
I saw it on Alton Brown's new Good Eats a few months ago and got scared away, he made a very complex version that required first preserving lemons (https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/shakshuka-7424000), the recipe I posted above was really easy (and tasty).

I love AB's recipes and his shows, but damn, that man will refuse to use two steps when thirty-seven will do.

Offline 1995hoo

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2021)
« Reply #124: May 10, 2021, 06:28:18 PM »
that looks good.

I got carried away a bit for Mother's Day. Instead of going out I decided to cook for the family.  I picked up a 4-pack of filet minions from BJs, dry aged them for a few days in the fridge, and cooked them in a cast iron pan in butter for 4 minutes a side before putting them in the oven for about 7 minutes. I served them with a peppercorn-cream-brandy-rosemary sauce.

For side dishes I just baked a few potatoes and roasted some Brussel sprouts that I first marinated in olive oil, lemon juice, salt, pepper, and garlic powder.

And as a special treat I made Robert Irvine's smoked pork belly Mac and cheese (https://chefirvine.com/recipes/smoked-pork-belly-mac-cheese-as-seen-on-restaurant-impossible). While it was fantastic, I didn't think it through - the recipe calls for two pounds of elbow macaroni, we only had four of us, so I've got enough Mac and Cheese left over to feed our neighbors. 

We originally planned filet mignon until my mom mentioned that she had gotten a veal chop from the same butcher a few weeks ago and liked it but was nervous cooking it because she’d never done it before—something like that would have been something my father would have cooked. So I asked if they had any and he brought out a big rack of veal and cut three chops for me on the spot. I knew she would not have had the recipe I posted above.