Author Topic: Rolling Thunder  (Read 33749 times)

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Offline mitlen

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Re: Rolling Thunder
« Reply #550: March 29, 2019, 01:47:33 PM »
Quandry:    Invited to a young neighbor lad's wedding on the same day as the last Rolling Thunder.

Online varoadking

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Re: Rolling Thunder
« Reply #551: March 29, 2019, 04:24:03 PM »
Quandry:    Invited to a young neighbor lad's wedding on the same day as the last Rolling Thunder.

Tell him you'll go to his next one...

Offline mitlen

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Re: Rolling Thunder
« Reply #552: March 29, 2019, 04:26:03 PM »
Tell him you'll go to his next one...

:spit:

Online imref

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Re: Rolling Thunder
« Reply #553: March 29, 2019, 05:55:10 PM »
Tell him you'll go to his next one...

:hysterical:  post of the year candidate

Offline mitlen

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Re: Rolling Thunder
« Reply #554: May 04, 2019, 12:51:55 PM »
Kent State   May 4, 1970

Offline Natsinpwc

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Re: Rolling Thunder
« Reply #555: May 04, 2019, 03:35:59 PM »

Offline mitlen

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Re: Rolling Thunder
« Reply #556: May 04, 2019, 03:40:48 PM »


I was at Ft. Polk, LA (11B).     US had invaded Camodia, "Let It Be" (single) had just been released and there I was.

Online imref

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Re: Rolling Thunder
« Reply #557: May 09, 2019, 03:11:56 PM »
WWII-era C-47s planes are scheduled to fly over Arlington Cemetery tomorrow (Friday) around 11:30 AM to commemorate the 75th anniversary of D-Day.  From there, they are heading to Normandy.

https://buff.ly/2VNYrKy?fbclid=IwAR3Uc2C0hZ9cy6BeyxbMDYzvuxWUyTKXbrsXFhaR_1dV93Q_MfkbwkwqTxk

Offline mitlen

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Re: Rolling Thunder
« Reply #558: May 09, 2019, 04:05:01 PM »
WWII-era C-47s planes are scheduled to fly over Arlington Cemetery tomorrow (Friday) around 11:30 AM to commemorate the 75th anniversary of D-Day.  From there, they are heading to Normandy.

https://buff.ly/2VNYrKy?fbclid=IwAR3Uc2C0hZ9cy6BeyxbMDYzvuxWUyTKXbrsXFhaR_1dV93Q_MfkbwkwqTxk

Couple of years ago, I saw a formation fly down the Potomac.     Looks like this group will head more to the west and south.

Offline HondoKillebrew

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Re: Rolling Thunder
« Reply #559: May 09, 2019, 10:44:22 PM »
WWII-era C-47s planes are scheduled to fly over Arlington Cemetery tomorrow (Friday) around 11:30 AM to commemorate the 75th anniversary of D-Day.  From there, they are heading to Normandy.

https://buff.ly/2VNYrKy?fbclid=IwAR3Uc2C0hZ9cy6BeyxbMDYzvuxWUyTKXbrsXFhaR_1dV93Q_MfkbwkwqTxk

C-47s and DC-3s, amazing workhorses for decades. 

Offline JCA-CrystalCity

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Re: Rolling Thunder
« Reply #560: May 10, 2019, 09:51:56 AM »
How are they getting to Normandy?  Even in good shape, did DC-3s have the range to fly the distance?  Do they stop in Iceland on the circle route?  Are these planes in good enough shape to go distances over water?

Online HalfSmokes

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Re: Rolling Thunder
« Reply #561: May 10, 2019, 10:15:06 AM »
Boat? I can’t imagine they’d risk flying those things over open ocean

Online imref

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Re: Rolling Thunder
« Reply #562: May 10, 2019, 10:20:13 AM »
How are they getting to Normandy?  Even in good shape, did DC-3s have the range to fly the distance?  Do they stop in Iceland on the circle route?  Are these planes in good enough shape to go distances over water?

I'd imagine several stops along the way.  They have almost a month to get there.

Offline Ali the Baseball Cat

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Re: Rolling Thunder
« Reply #563: May 10, 2019, 10:45:33 AM »
Going to trot over to Meridian Hill to try to give it a squizz from afar.  They're loud, so we'll know when they're getting close. 

Offline mitlen

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Re: Rolling Thunder
« Reply #564: May 10, 2019, 02:37:18 PM »
Stopped by the local Potomac site and waited.     Thought the formation would be coming up river toward Frederick.    Several people were there when I arrived and they said the planes hadn't come through.    I waited til one.    Then bailed out.

Offline Ali the Baseball Cat

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Re: Rolling Thunder
« Reply #565: May 10, 2019, 03:04:59 PM »
Maybe this was a ruse...like the fake drop zone at Calais. 

Online imref

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Re: Rolling Thunder
« Reply #566: May 10, 2019, 03:57:00 PM »
Stopped by the local Potomac site and waited.     Thought the formation would be coming up river toward Frederick.    Several people were there when I arrived and they said the planes hadn't come through.    I waited til one.    Then bailed out.

saw a video on twitter, 6 planes flying over Arlington.

found it:
https://twitter.com/JamesScott2/status/1126906205530656768

Offline dracnal

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Re: Rolling Thunder
« Reply #567: May 10, 2019, 04:01:28 PM »
So I did a quick lookup with Google. The C-47 has a range of around 2100 miles. It's over 8200 miles from LA to Bangkok and I know for certain they were flying out of Thailand during the Vietnam War.  It's either in flight refueling, several shorter hops, or boats.

Offline mitlen

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Re: Rolling Thunder
« Reply #568: May 10, 2019, 04:02:24 PM »
saw a video on twitter, 6 planes flying over Arlington.

found it:
https://twitter.com/JamesScott2/status/1126906205530656768

Looks like they were heading more westerly than my location along the Potomac in E. Loudoun.    Thanks for the post.

Offline Ali the Baseball Cat

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Re: Rolling Thunder
« Reply #569: May 10, 2019, 04:10:44 PM »
LA to Honolulu is like 2500 miles, so that's a problem.  Anchorage to Tokyo is like 1 1/2 times that.  Maybe they shipped them to Okinawa or the Philippines and flew from there. 

There were still a lot of US airbases around Thailand when I was growing up there in the late 70s.  None were still in use, but the nearby towns had an awful lot of English signage and American beer and cigarettes for sale. 

So I did a quick lookup with Google. The C-47 has a range of around 2100 miles. It's over 8200 miles from LA to Bangkok and I know for certain they were flying out of Thailand during the Vietnam War.  It's either in flight refueling, several shorter hops, or boats.

Offline dracnal

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Re: Rolling Thunder
« Reply #570: May 11, 2019, 05:46:18 PM »
So my Dad was a command pilot with more than 5600 hours of flight time and four years served in Vietnam. I asked him about the C47's and how they made it across the Atlantic and Pacific. He sent me what I found to be a really fascinating answer, so I'm just going to post the whole thing below - everything else in this is from him:

The C-47 carried between 2,000 and 2,200 gallons of fuel in four wing tanks.  That gave the bird a range of about 1,600 statute miles (the miles we drive on the highway) or about 1,390 nautical miles.  (The statute mile is 5,280 feet long while the nautical mile (which is used for air and sea navigation) is 6,080 feet long.  I’ll come back to this later.

Four additional fuel tanks containing a total of 800 – 820 gallons could be installed in the passenger compartment to extend the range to 3,600 statute miles or 3,100 nautical miles.  The weight of those tanks limited the total number of people on board to no more than about 5 – essentially the flight crew and its crew chief.

The most likely route for the transatlantic flights would have been up the east coast of the US, with stops either at Gander, Newfoundland (where all the US-bound airliners from Europe were diverted following the 9/11 attacks on the US) or Goose Bay Labrador (I’ve landed at Goose Bay).  From there, stops in Greenland, Iceland, either Shanwick, Ireland or Prestwick, Scotland and then on to final destination.

For the transpacific route I am guessing that it involved stops in Hawaii, and then there are all sorts of places from there to the Asian coast – Wake Island, Midway, Guam, Philippines, etc. and then on into Asia.

Nautical miles are used in air and sea navigation because 1 nm = 1 minute of latitude.   The distance from the equator to either the north or the south pole is 5,400nm.  That equals about 6,200 statute miles which when multiplied by 4 equals just about the circumference of the earth as we know it to be.

In the mid-60s I had the chance to check out in the C-47 and maintain my T-28 certification at the same time.  Glad I did not pursue the C-47 as I would most likely have been flying that in Vietnam; I viewed my chances of survival MUCH better in the C-130.

Again, great question – fun doing the research!

Offline JCA-CrystalCity

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Re: Rolling Thunder
« Reply #571: May 11, 2019, 05:52:11 PM »
thanks dracnal!  So, if they fly these things over, they are going to have to carry avgas in the cargo area.   :nervous:

Online imref

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Re: Rolling Thunder
« Reply #572: May 11, 2019, 05:54:23 PM »
Very cool. Thanks for sharing.

Offline mitlen

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Re: Rolling Thunder
« Reply #573: May 12, 2019, 09:40:25 AM »
Sunday, May 12, 2019 (part of LEU Memorial Week)

Law Enforcement United (LEU) Bike Ride (used to be called Police Law Ride)

Arrival Ceremony will begin at 2:00 p.m. at the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial.

DC United First Responder Night at Audi Field  ....  Join DC United as they take on Sporting KC in a game that honors first responders and benefits public safety. Special discounted ticket with portion going to The National Police Foundation in honor of Police Week. Purchase tickets through this link to support law enforcement: https://t.co/wqOaThr1sa. 7:00pm at Audi Field in Washington, DC.


Offline Ali the Baseball Cat

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Re: Rolling Thunder
« Reply #574: May 13, 2019, 09:32:30 AM »
That's amazing.  South Africa was still using those for maritime patrols in the 90s...probably still are.  And probably still will be in another 50 years.   
So my Dad was a command pilot with more than 5600 hours of flight time and four years served in Vietnam. I asked him about the C47's and how they made it across the Atlantic and Pacific. He sent me what I found to be a really fascinating answer, so I'm just going to post the whole thing below - everything else in this is from him:

The C-47 carried between 2,000 and 2,200 gallons of fuel in four wing tanks.  That gave the bird a range of about 1,600 statute miles (the miles we drive on the highway) or about 1,390 nautical miles.  (The statute mile is 5,280 feet long while the nautical mile (which is used for air and sea navigation) is 6,080 feet long.  I’ll come back to this later.

Four additional fuel tanks containing a total of 800 – 820 gallons could be installed in the passenger compartment to extend the range to 3,600 statute miles or 3,100 nautical miles.  The weight of those tanks limited the total number of people on board to no more than about 5 – essentially the flight crew and its crew chief.

The most likely route for the transatlantic flights would have been up the east coast of the US, with stops either at Gander, Newfoundland (where all the US-bound airliners from Europe were diverted following the 9/11 attacks on the US) or Goose Bay Labrador (I’ve landed at Goose Bay).  From there, stops in Greenland, Iceland, either Shanwick, Ireland or Prestwick, Scotland and then on to final destination.

For the transpacific route I am guessing that it involved stops in Hawaii, and then there are all sorts of places from there to the Asian coast – Wake Island, Midway, Guam, Philippines, etc. and then on into Asia.

Nautical miles are used in air and sea navigation because 1 nm = 1 minute of latitude.   The distance from the equator to either the north or the south pole is 5,400nm.  That equals about 6,200 statute miles which when multiplied by 4 equals just about the circumference of the earth as we know it to be.

In the mid-60s I had the chance to check out in the C-47 and maintain my T-28 certification at the same time.  Glad I did not pursue the C-47 as I would most likely have been flying that in Vietnam; I viewed my chances of survival MUCH better in the C-130.

Again, great question – fun doing the research!