Author Topic: this is NOT GOOD.  (Read 1368 times)

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Offline JMW IV

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this is NOT GOOD.
« Topic Start: February 25, 2006, 04:34:16 PM »
Brian Lawrence has a Torn Labrum.

he's done until at least August.

not good at all.

Offline rileyn

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this is NOT GOOD.
« Reply #1: February 25, 2006, 04:44:20 PM »
Too crazy.  In The Post today he talks about how DC fans can count on him and he hasn't missed a start in (however long), and then Tom Boswell actually wrote, "Knock on wood."

Damn.

Offline rileyn

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this is NOT GOOD.
« Reply #2: February 25, 2006, 04:46:42 PM »
I wish Armas wasn't choosing to dick around with the Venezuela WBC team - he needs to be in Viera.  Let's also hope Drese can hold it together.

Why am I having flashbacks of last September when we were trotting out a new relief pitcher to pitch every inning.  OMG!!!!!!

Offline NatsAddict

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this is NOT GOOD.
« Reply #3: February 25, 2006, 06:35:14 PM »
Quote
Labrum, It Nearly Killed Him
Why the torn labrum is baseball's most fearsome injury.
By Will Carroll
Posted Thursday, May 20, 2004, at 5:02 PM ET

Nen: sidelined by a bum shoulder

Nen: sidelined by a bum shoulder
The San Francisco Giants' Robb Nen, one of the best relief pitchers in baseball, had off-season surgery in 2002 to "clean up loose particles" in his shoulder. What Nen didn't know is that he had a torn labrum, the fearsome modern baseball injury that strikes down pitchers quickly, stealthily, and painfully. Eighteen months and three surgeries later, Nen is still waiting to throw his next major-league pitch. The leading minds in baseball medicine are flummoxed by the labrum. Doctors can't agree on how to detect a tear, don't know the best way to fix one, and aren't sure why, almost without fail, a torn labrum will destroy a pitcher's career.

Leading baseball surgeon Dr. James Andrews estimates that 85 percent of pitchers make a full recovery after an ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction, aka the once risky Tommy John surgery. (USA Today has even called the surgery the "pitcher's best friend.") But if pitchers with torn labrums were horses, they'd be destroyed. Of the 36 major-league hurlers diagnosed with labrum tears in the last five years, only midlevel reliever Rocky Biddle has returned to his previous level. Think about that when your favorite pitcher comes down with labrum trouble: He has a 3 percent chance of becoming Rocky Biddle. More likely, he'll turn into Mike Harkey, Robert Person, or Jim Parque, pitchers who lost stamina and velocity?and a major-league career?when their labrums began to fray.

Slate

Nen's career ended last offseason.  He never again even pitched in as much as a simulated game.  So it's now 1 out of 37.

Nate Bump, a Marlins relief pitcher, is coming back this year from a torn labrum.  Fortunately for Bump, he couldn't get any worse.

Offline The Chief

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this is NOT GOOD.
« Reply #4: February 25, 2006, 07:23:18 PM »
Why oh why does this remind me of buying a bad car from a dealer who knows it has a problem?  :roll:

Offline tomterp

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this is NOT GOOD.
« Reply #5: February 25, 2006, 09:57:22 PM »
So am I supposed to believe that Drese will be the first starter to come back?

Online PC

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Lawrence also has torn rotator cuff!!!
« Reply #6: February 27, 2006, 01:35:22 PM »
Pitcher Also Has a Torn Rotator Cuff

By Dave Sheinin
Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, February 27, 2006; E07


VIERA, Fla., Feb. 26 -- Washington Nationals right-hander Brian Lawrence had surgery Sunday to repair his torn right labrum, and during the surgery doctors also discovered that Lawrence had a torn rotator cuff, which also was repaired. The additional injury makes it more likely Lawrence will miss the entire season.

A team official described the tears as "extensive" but said the Nationals hoped Lawrence could begin throwing in 12 weeks and return to the active roster in four to eight months. He is expected to rejoin the team in Viera and begin physical therapy.

However, it often takes far longer to rehabilitate shoulder injuries such as Lawrence's. Nationals pitcher Tony Armas Jr. had a similar surgery in May 2003 and has not pitched a full season in the majors since then.

Lawrence, 29, was acquired in November in a trade with the San Diego Padres for veteran third baseman Vinny Castilla, and was expected to begin the season as the third or fourth starter.

Online PC

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this is NOT GOOD.
« Reply #7: February 27, 2006, 01:35:50 PM »
Did he pass a physical when the trade was made???

Montcobaseball

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this is NOT GOOD.
« Reply #8: February 28, 2006, 07:26:27 PM »
The paper says that the Nats passed on an MRI for Lawrence because of all the innings he pitched in the past and that MRI's "cost $10,000".  That was a quote from the either the general manager or the president.  Now I have had two MRI's in the last six months and the most expensive was $1950.00.  There is no way that an MRI on a shoulder costs $10,000 unless they were talking about doing every body part.

Offline The Chief

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this is NOT GOOD.
« Reply #9: February 28, 2006, 07:59:03 PM »
Anybody notice they elected to do an MRI on Astacio before committing?  How's the saying go, fool me twice?  :roll:

Offline UMDNats

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this is NOT GOOD.
« Reply #10: March 01, 2006, 06:54:03 PM »
ah, poop.