Author Topic: Frozen Rope and Other Terms  (Read 1983 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Frozen Rope and Other Terms
« Topic Start: July 19, 2007, 11:20:51 PM »
"And he hits a frozen rope over the wall!"

A frozen rope?  :shock:  Where the hell did this term come from, anyone know?  What is the history behind it?  I heard someone on XM the other day use this term to describe a homerun and I thought it was the dumbest term I've ever heard.  Homerun, long ball, a bomb, a blast....these terms I am more used to.

Then a week or two ago, can't remember the announcer but, he kept referring to homeplate as "the dish." 

 :bang:  IT'S A PLATE!

Offline 2k6nats

  • Posts: 9255
  • All in on the Nats
Re: Frozen Rope and Other Terms
« Reply #1: July 20, 2007, 01:59:47 AM »
"And he hits a frozen rope over the wall!"

A frozen rope?  :shock:  Where the hell did this term come from, anyone know?  What is the history behind it?  I heard someone on XM the other day use this term to describe a homerun and I thought it was the dumbest term I've ever heard.  Homerun, long ball, a bomb, a blast....these terms I am more used to.

Then a week or two ago, can't remember the announcer but, he kept referring to homeplate as "the dish." 

 :bang:  IT'S A PLATE!

I'm assuming you've heard "the dish" and "frozen rope" before.  Anyway, think of a frozen rope.  Long, straight, hard, and clean. [That's what she said] :lol:

As for "the dish", the plate and the surrounding area looks like a dish.

Offline DPMOmaha

  • Posts: 19191
Re: Frozen Rope and Other Terms
« Reply #2: July 20, 2007, 02:16:33 AM »
How about "Texas leaguer" for a bloop hit.  or a "can of corn" for an easy pop fly.

Re: Frozen Rope and Other Terms
« Reply #3: July 20, 2007, 05:39:42 AM »
I'm assuming you've heard "the dish" and "frozen rope" before.  Anyway, think of a frozen rope.  Long, straight, hard, and clean. [That's what she said] :lol:

As for "the dish", the plate and the surrounding area looks like a dish.

Thank you for the explanation on frozen rope.

I know what the guy meant by "dish" but since I was a kid it has always been plate.  I hate announcers that try to coin new terms.

Offline natsfan1a

  • Posts: 6512
Re: Frozen Rope and Other Terms
« Reply #4: July 20, 2007, 06:39:37 AM »
The New Dickson Baseball Dictionary, by Paul Dickson, is a great source of info on terminology. It's very comprehensive, delves into the origins of terms, and it's a fun read, too.

Online spidernat

  • Posts: 58779
  • The Lerners are Cheap AND Crooked
Re: Frozen Rope and Other Terms
« Reply #5: July 20, 2007, 10:15:12 AM »
I'm assuming you've heard "the dish" and "frozen rope" before.  Anyway, think of a frozen rope.  Long, straight, hard, and clean. [That's what she said] :lol:



 :funny:

Offline Dave B

  • Posts: 6028
Re: Frozen Rope and Other Terms
« Reply #6: July 20, 2007, 11:27:30 AM »
can of corn:

back in the day corn was on the top shelf in grocery stores (or maybe they just picked corn for the hell of it. substitute beans if you want). to get it down, they pulled it off with a hook and caught it. thus the easy soft catch = can of corn

or so somebody told me

makes sense though

Offline tomterp

  • Global Moderator
  • ****
  • Posts: 29825
  • Hell yes!
Re: Frozen Rope and Other Terms
« Reply #7: July 20, 2007, 12:23:40 PM »
C'mon, ducks on the pond!

There goes a tater!

He had 3 dingies in one game.


Offline shoeshineboy

  • Posts: 7721
  • Walks Kill!! Walks Kill! Walks Kill!!!!
Re: Frozen Rope and Other Terms
« Reply #8: July 20, 2007, 12:57:52 PM »
can of corn:

back in the day corn was on the top shelf in grocery stores (or maybe they just picked corn for the hell of it. substitute beans if you want). to get it down, they pulled it off with a hook and caught it. thus the easy soft catch = can of corn

or so somebody told me

makes sense though

Correct. (Think of the movies or TV shows that show the old small country stores with stuff stacked up to the ceiling.)

Offline Senators2005

  • Lake Ridge, VA
  • Posts: 12263
  • Go Natsssssss!
    • http://nationalsnation.spaces.live.com/
Re: Frozen Rope and Other Terms
« Reply #9: July 20, 2007, 03:53:41 PM »
Golden Sombrero - You get it when you suck at the plate by making 4 strikeouts in a game.  :pimp:

Offline natsfan1a

  • Posts: 6512
Re: Frozen Rope and Other Terms
« Reply #10: July 20, 2007, 03:59:43 PM »
To me, one of the more obscure baseball terms is "Linda Ronstadt" for a fastball (because of her rendition of Blue Bayou, blew by you...). A bit of a stretch, that one. For that matter, why not call it the Roy Orbison? :)

Offline tomterp

  • Global Moderator
  • ****
  • Posts: 29825
  • Hell yes!
Re: Frozen Rope and Other Terms
« Reply #11: July 20, 2007, 04:47:42 PM »
I bet today's players have 20 more that we've never heard, some of them perhaps contemperanous in nature.  Hiller20, if you're out there, would you share some of the current jargon of the game with us?

Re: Frozen Rope and Other Terms
« Reply #12: July 22, 2007, 10:41:06 PM »
Fungo or Fungoes:  A fly ball hit for fielding practice by a player who tosses the ball up and hits it on its way down with a long, thin, light bat.

Offline Dave B

  • Posts: 6028
Re: Frozen Rope and Other Terms
« Reply #13: July 22, 2007, 11:06:45 PM »

Offline soxfan59

  • Posts: 1202
  • Gough, Gough White Sox!!!
    • John R. Russell, Ltd.
Re: Frozen Rope and Other Terms
« Reply #14: July 23, 2007, 12:54:50 PM »
To me, one of the more obscure baseball terms is "Linda Ronstadt" for a fastball (because of her rendition of Blue Bayou, blew by you...). A bit of a stretch, that one. For that matter, why not call it the Roy Orbison? :)

I'm sure it has something to do with the fact that Roy Orbison never looked good in a dress. :)

And "dish" has been a common jargon term for home plate for as long as I can remember. "Dish" can also refer to the art of pitching itself.  "Here comes the dish" (the pitch), or "He's really dishing it tonight" (pitching well).  You could combine both meanings -- John Garland is really dishing over the dish tonight!

My favorite baseball slang term to use at little league games, when the bases are loaded, is to proclaim, "Ladies and gentleman, the bags are juiced!"

Offline tomterp

  • Global Moderator
  • ****
  • Posts: 29825
  • Hell yes!
Re: Frozen Rope and Other Terms
« Reply #15: July 23, 2007, 01:42:43 PM »
I always wondered where the term "shortstop" came from.

Offline NatsAddict

  • Posts: 4095
Re: Frozen Rope and Other Terms
« Reply #16: July 23, 2007, 01:48:51 PM »
I always wondered where the term "shortstop" came from.


Quote
The origin of the word "shortstop" appears to have been lost in the mists of antiquity, but the absence of the facts has never prevented me from making something up, and the present case is no exception. I have here a Currier & Ives lithograph that purports to depict the first officially recorded baseball game, which occurred on or about June 19, 1846, in Hoboken, New Jersey, between the Knickerbockers and the New York Nine. Notwithstanding the fact that the Knickerbockers had made up the rules, they lost. Not what you would call a team of destiny.

Anyway, the print shows most of the infielders standing more or less on top of their bases, with the shortstop situated on the infield grass, perhaps 20 feet closer to home than his modern counterpart. Other sources confirm that this was the usual practice in the early days.

We may further note that the baseballs of yesteryear were fatter and, how shall we say, deader--that strikes me uneuphoniously, but you know what I mean--than they are today, and partook more of the bulbous quality that is commemorated nowadays in such phrases as "heave the old tomato, Jack." Moreover, this was the era before the introduction of the mechanical lawnmower, when infields were savage jungles that captured and ate innocent baseballs, or at least kept them from getting very far.

So it is not difficult to suppose that in the infancy of the game, there may have been a need for an infielder who could deal with short-range ground balls expeditiously, before they dribbled to a halt and got lost somewhere--who could "stop them short," you see. Sure you do. Later, of course, when the ball got livelier and the grass was more carefully attended to, the velocity of the average grounder would increase considerably, requiring the shortstop to retreat and join the other infielders in the wide arc that characterizes modern defensive alignment.

There are a couple holes in this theory, but I leave it to the inevitable gang of malcontents to point them out.

StraightDope.com

Offline 2k6nats

  • Posts: 9255
  • All in on the Nats
Re: Frozen Rope and Other Terms
« Reply #17: July 23, 2007, 01:55:53 PM »
And the term "shortstop" might be because of the fact that most grounders would "stop short" of the other infielders.

Re: Frozen Rope and Other Terms
« Reply #18: July 23, 2007, 03:12:26 PM »
You can pull up some really dirty sexual images when saying "Toeing the Rubber."

Offline NatsAddict

  • Posts: 4095
Re: Frozen Rope and Other Terms
« Reply #19: July 23, 2007, 03:25:02 PM »
What about "boning"?

Offline Kenz aFan

  • Posts: 5433
Re: Frozen Rope and Other Terms
« Reply #20: July 23, 2007, 06:52:51 PM »
I always wondered where the term "shortstop" came from.

Probably because the position is just a short stop past second base.

Offline natsfan1a

  • Posts: 6512
Re: Frozen Rope and Other Terms
« Reply #21: July 25, 2007, 09:24:17 AM »
Schneider used one in the gamer on the team site that's new to me. I've heard "in his wheelhouse" but not "in the happy zone," which for the Nats was more like the sad zone :(

"It went in the happy zone. We were not trying to go there," Schneider said. "We didn't want to get beat on the short side of the park and we tried to make him hit it the other way. We made a mistake on the pitch and he made us pay."