Author Topic: Mariners and A’s to play 2019’s Opening Series in Tokyo (not confirmed)  (Read 414 times)

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Offline dcpatti

  • Posts: 2743
https://www.sfchronicle.com/athletics/amp/A-s-will-open-2019-season-in-Tokyo-against-12631165.php?

MLB has not yet announced but the Chronicle is usually right in their sports rumors. I REALLY want to go.

Offline OldChelsea

  • Posts: 7499
  • From the best seat in the house at Nationals Park
That would be fun, taking in Japan's baseball traditions...I'd also like to catch one of those NFL matches in London (wonder if they'll keep that Philadelphia vs Jacksonville match they originally had scheduled for there).

Tokyo is easier to reach nowadays since close-in Haneda airport is getting more of the long-haul traffic - unfortunately both direct flights from Dulles land at Narita, which is some 40mi out of town and costs a king's ransom (to say nothing of time) to get into town from. If I were going I'd take American Airlines to San Francisco and catch JAL's flight to Haneda from there (full disclosure: I am a member of a OneWorld Alliance loyalty scheme).

Offline Elvir Ovcina

  • Posts: 1992
That would be fun, taking in Japan's baseball traditions...I'd also like to catch one of those NFL matches in London (wonder if they'll keep that Philadelphia vs Jacksonville match they originally had scheduled for there).

Tokyo is easier to reach nowadays since close-in Haneda airport is getting more of the long-haul traffic - unfortunately both direct flights from Dulles land at Narita, which is some 40mi out of town and costs a king's ransom (to say nothing of time) to get into town from. If I were going I'd take American Airlines to San Francisco and catch JAL's flight to Haneda from there (full disclosure: I am a member of a OneWorld Alliance loyalty scheme).

The Narita Express train isn't too expensive (~$30 dollars each way) - I've had good luck with it.  But if you want to stay oneworld and go to Haneda, you can also connect through JFK (AA to JFK, JAL from there).  The total route is much, much more efficient that way - it's 500 miles shorter than going through SFO.

Offline dcpatti

  • Posts: 2743
The hotel busses into Tokyo from Narita aren't bad; they are comfy, cost-effective and have free wifi. If you're staying at one of the big chain hotels, you can usually get dropped off right at your doorstep if you pick the right bus route.  Haneda is definitely closer in, but still a hike, and might not be enough of a convenience factor to go from that nonstop to a connection, assuming all other factors are equal.

There is an outstanding volunteer guide group, http://www.tokyofreeguide.org/, who will pair you with an English-speaking Tokyo resident who will take you on pretty much any reasonable itinerary of your choosing, provided you pay for the guide's admissions, meals and other expenses while exploring together. Considering a 2-hour group walking tour of the fish market runs about $75/person, a private, personal guide for the cost of one extra admission is a steal.  They do limit it to 2 days I believe. It would be AWESOME to have a local take you to a game and teach you all the cheers and stuff, plus there are some places where you really do need to have a Japanese speaker with you (like the sumo stables, which won't even let you in if you don't have a Japanese speaker with you and will kick you out if you don't follow their strict customs... having a local helps a lot...).  If we are able to go to these games, we're definitely going to get a guide!

Offline Natsinpwc

  • Posts: 11506
The hotel busses into Tokyo from Narita aren't bad; they are comfy, cost-effective and have free wifi. If you're staying at one of the big chain hotels, you can usually get dropped off right at your doorstep if you pick the right bus route.  Haneda is definitely closer in, but still a hike, and might not be enough of a convenience factor to go from that nonstop to a connection, assuming all other factors are equal.

There is an outstanding volunteer guide group, http://www.tokyofreeguide.org/, who will pair you with an English-speaking Tokyo resident who will take you on pretty much any reasonable itinerary of your choosing, provided you pay for the guide's admissions, meals and other expenses while exploring together. Considering a 2-hour group walking tour of the fish market runs about $75/person, a private, personal guide for the cost of one extra admission is a steal.  They do limit it to 2 days I believe. It would be AWESOME to have a local take you to a game and teach you all the cheers and stuff, plus there are some places where you really do need to have a Japanese speaker with you (like the sumo stables, which won't even let you in if you don't have a Japanese speaker with you and will kick you out if you don't follow their strict customs... having a local helps a lot...).  If we are able to go to these games, we're definitely going to get a guide!
I wandered around Tokyo on my own several days. Pre Internet. People there are very nice and we're always coming up to me on the subway asking if I needed help. Those guides sound like a really great idea.

Offline varoadking

  • Posts: 22396
  • This is Howie do it...
There is an outstanding volunteer guide group...provided you pay for the guide's...meals...

With my luck, I'd get a Sumo wrestler...

Offline dcpatti

  • Posts: 2743
With my luck, I'd get a Sumo wrestler...

That’s a good thing; it’s really hard to get in to watch a sumo match in general. If you show up with a wrestler, you’re guaranteed to get in!

I wandered around Tokyo on my own several days. Pre Internet. People there are very nice and we're always coming up to me on the subway asking if I needed help. Those guides sound like a really great idea.

We had a guide for 2 days  and he was awesome. He taught us how to use the subway and also a lot of the local etiquette. We were there over New Years which is not the best time to visit Tokyo; everything (literally everything) is closed, so he took us to some of the “locals only” type places, like the small ancestor gardens in residential areas, and random tiny temples the size of 2 parking spaces.  He also helped us plan our itinerary for the remainder of our trip, so we could explore the city despite everything being closed. I probably would have hated Tokyo without that help, unless we’d been there at a different time of year.

Offline Ali the Baseball Cat

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  • babble on
I'm so there.   

Offline Count Walewski

  • Posts: 1892
I hope to one day see a Japanese baseball game. Unfortunately, my first and so far only trip to Japan was during the offseason.

Re: Tokyo, I found it easier to get lost in Tokyo than anywhere else in the world I've ever been. The way street addresses there work is...they don't really work. I definitely recommend having a fast data plan and using Google Maps to get around. I actually rented a mifi device so the pocket of my cargo pants was my own personal hot spot, which let me use Google Maps everywhere I went.

Offline Ali the Baseball Cat

  • Posts: 14618
  • babble on
For me that was Sofia in the mid 90s...no English signage, for that matter no Roman alphabet...crazy street plan and no internet to fall back on.  But great beer that cost almost nothing...I had a blast  :lol:

Not a lot of besbol in Bulgaria though.  More of a wrestling/water polo kind of place.   
I hope to one day see a Japanese baseball game. Unfortunately, my first and so far only trip to Japan was during the offseason.

Re: Tokyo, I found it easier to get lost in Tokyo than anywhere else in the world I've ever been. The way street addresses there work is...they don't really work. I definitely recommend having a fast data plan and using Google Maps to get around. I actually rented a mifi device so the pocket of my cargo pants was my own personal hot spot, which let me use Google Maps everywhere I went.

Offline OldChelsea

  • Posts: 7499
  • From the best seat in the house at Nationals Park
For me that was Sofia in the mid 90s...no English signage, for that matter no Roman alphabet...crazy street plan and no internet to fall back on.  But great beer that cost almost nothing...I had a blast  :lol: [...]

I was there in May of last tear and regularly patronised a small café near my hotel that had half-litre cans of really tasty lager for a bit over a dollar each. The Cyrillic still dominates though (no problem for me since I already speak some Russian).