Author Topic: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2018)  (Read 2096 times)

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Online JCA-CrystalCity

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2018)
« Reply #75: April 27, 2018, 07:06:45 PM »
I had a great fisherman's platter up in NH last night.  Clams, scallops, shrimp and a piece of haddock. Quite large and quite good.  I was there by myself, but when they brought it out, they brought two sets of silverware because they just assumed. 

Offline Natsinpwc

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2018)
« Reply #76: April 27, 2018, 07:39:08 PM »
I had a great fisherman's platter up in NH last night.  Clams, scallops, shrimp and a piece of haddock. Quite large and quite good.  I was there by myself, but when they brought it out, they brought two sets of silverware because they just assumed.
sounds great; nothing like fresh seafood

Offline 1995hoo

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2018)
« Reply #77: May 12, 2018, 05:12:45 PM »
My parents are coming over for dinner tonight for Mother’s Day (we do Saturday for convenience and because Mom prefers it) and I’m finally making the pork recipe found in the post below from last year’s edition of this thread. It’s not gonna look like the picture. I don’t think the butcher cut the meat quite the way the recipe envisions. I’m a bit nervous on the timing—could take less time, more time, or the time specified, so we started it early because Mathguy said his took longer than the recipe said. (We also wound up with too much of the filling. Maybe we can use it with pasta or in an omelet.)

I sure hope this comes out nicely. Between this and the trifle my wife made for dessert, it feels like we’ve been in the kitchen all day.

http://www.wnff.net/index.php?topic=34849.msg1909224#msg1909224

Online skippy1999

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2018)
« Reply #78: May 12, 2018, 07:22:06 PM »
Hence the reason for Mother’s Day I make reservations :mg:

Offline 1995hoo

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2018)
« Reply #79: May 13, 2018, 09:40:13 AM »
Well, ours took pretty much spot-on the time specified in the recipe, so it was done very early, a good hour before we planned to eat, so I tented it with foil to keep it warm even though I knew that risked making it overcooked. It did wind up a little overcooked but it wasn't dried out, still tasted very good. It also didn't present as nicely because I wasn't able to roll it as well, so our plates wound up with pieces of pork surrounded with spoonfuls of the stuffing. Oh well, still a successful dinner. Doubt I will be making that recipe again this year because it's just so much food. We have a lot of leftovers. Maybe I will eat some for lunch on Tuesday before we go to the Caps game so I can help the Caps by farting the Bolts' shots away from the net.

Online varoadking

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2018)
« Reply #80: May 13, 2018, 04:32:16 PM »
Well, ours took pretty much spot-on the time specified in the recipe, so it was done very early, a good hour before we planned to eat, so I tented it with foil to keep it warm even though I knew that risked making it overcooked. It did wind up a little overcooked but it wasn't dried out, still tasted very good. It also didn't present as nicely because I wasn't able to roll it as well, so our plates wound up with pieces of pork surrounded with spoonfuls of the stuffing. Oh well, still a successful dinner. Doubt I will be making that recipe again this year because it's just so much food. We have a lot of leftovers. Maybe I will eat some for lunch on Tuesday before we go to the Caps game so I can help the Caps by farting the Bolts' shots away from the net.

We'll be there on Tuesday night as well...  :thumbs:

Offline imref

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Offline imref

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2018)
« Reply #83: May 13, 2018, 08:22:35 PM »
Came out very good on the grill.


Online JCA-CrystalCity

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2018)
« Reply #85: June 22, 2018, 09:00:23 AM »
I mentioned in a GDT that my brother regularly hits the butcher shop at the Tuckaway Tavern in Raymond, NH.  The owner / chef there has been featured on Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives and won the cookoff Fieri had last summer among his favorite chefs.  My brother grabbed some ribeyes and a burger (his wife loves them; very good) while I picked up a humongo chicken breast marinated in a bourbon - maple mix.  The chicken breast came out great even though it had to be kept on the grill a long time due to its size.  If you are driving up to Maine or Winnipesaukee, it is very close to the 101, which is the cut-over from US-3 and I-93 around Manchester towards Portsmouth.  http://www.thetuckaway.com/

Offline NatNasty

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Re: Food and How You Cook/Eat It (2018)
« Reply #86: July 08, 2018, 02:38:11 PM »
Cooked these snap beans for lunch today.  Delicious. 

I start with 1.5 lbs of beans, which yields about a pound after snapping off the tips.  I suggest using low sodium broth, or they'll be too salty imo.  Also, I increase Step 2 cooking time to 30 min.


Snap Beans with Mustard and Country Ham
by Jean Anderson

Ingredients

        1 tablespoon butter, bacon drippings, or vegetable oil
        3 ounces uncooked country ham, finely diced
        6 medium scallions, trimmed and coarsely chopped (including some green tops)
        1 pound tender young green beans, tipped and snapped in two if large
        1 1/2 cups chicken broth
        2 tablespoons all-purpose flour blended with 2 tablespoons cold water (thickener)
        2 teaspoons prepared yellow mustard
        1/4 teaspoon black pepper, or to taste

Preparation

        1. Melt the butter in a large, heavy saucepan over moderate heat, add the ham and scallions, and cook, stirring now and then, for 5 to 8 minutes or until lightly browned.
        2. Add the beans and broth and bring to a boil. Adjust the heat so the broth bubbles gently, cover, and cook for 12 to 15 minutes or until the beans are crisp-tender.
        3. Meanwhile, combine the thickener and the mustard and set aside. As soon as the beans are done, whisk a little of the hot broth into the mustard mixture, stir back into the pan, add the pepper, and cook, stirring constantly, for 3 minutes or until the broth thickens. Continue cooking uncovered, stirring occasionally, for 3 to 5 minutes or until the sauce has the consistency of a glaze.
        4. Taste the beans for salt and pepper, adjust as needed, and serve straightaway.