Author Topic: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2014)  (Read 25739 times)

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Offline Terpfan76

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2014)
« Reply #75: February 03, 2014, 11:12:50 AM »
I made chili yesterday as well. Ground beef, kielbasa, mushrooms and various other good stuff. Turned out well, but I didn't add habeneros this time.

Offline 1995hoo

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2014)
« Reply #76: February 05, 2014, 05:01:29 PM »
That tenderloin sounds really good. 

....

It was outstanding. Second time I've made it. This time was the better of the two. The first time (New Year's Eve) I used a roasting pan that was simply too big and I think that's why it took too long to cook. This time I followed the directions about taking a wire cooling rack and setting it over a rimmed baking pan. Worked out much better.

Here is the recipe. I suspect this may have been gleaned from a magazine, but I don't know—it was sent to me by a guy on a UVA sports forum. Note the key to this is to read the directions carefully before starting—preferably twice!—because it requires doing things in a specific order. You can make the bread-crumb mixture and the crushed potatoes earlier the same day if you want.

I got the meat at the Springfield Butcher and asked them to trim and tie it. Much easier than doing it myself.

1   beef tenderloin center-cut Châteaubriand (about 2 pounds), trimmed of fat and silver skin
    Kosher salt
3   tablespoons panko bread crumbs
1   cup plus 2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 1/4   teaspoons ground black pepper
1   small shallot , minced (about 1 1/2 tablespoons)
2   medium cloves garlic , minced or pressed through garlic press (about 2 teaspoons)
1/4   cup well-drained prepared horseradish
2   tablespoons minced fresh parsley leaves
1/2   teaspoon minced fresh thyme leaves
1   small russet potato (about 6 ounces), peeled and grated on large holes of box grater
1 1/2   teaspoons mayonnaise
1 1/2   teaspoons Dijon mustard
1/2   teaspoon powdered gelatin

Sprinkle roast with 1 tablespoon salt, cover with plastic wrap, and let stand at room temperature 1 hour or refrigerate for up to 24 hours.

Adjust oven rack to middle position and heat oven to 400 degrees.

Toss bread crumbs with 2 teaspoons oil, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper in 10-inch nonstick skillet. Cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until deep golden brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer to rimmed baking sheet and cool to room temperature (wipe out skillet). Once cool, toss bread crumbs with shallot, garlic, 2 tablespoons horseradish, parsley, and thyme.

Rinse grated potato under cold water, then squeeze dry in kitchen towel. Transfer potatoes and remaining cup oil to 10-inch nonstick skillet. Cook over high heat, stirring frequently, until potatoes are golden brown and crisp, 6 to 8 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer potatoes to paper towel-lined plate and season lightly with salt; let cool for 5 minutes. Reserve 1 tablespoon oil from skillet and discard remainder. Once potatoes are cool, transfer to quart-sized zipper-lock bag and crush until coarsely ground. Transfer potatoes to baking sheet with bread-crumb mixture and toss to combine.

Pat exterior of tenderloin dry with paper towels and sprinkle evenly with remaining teaspoon pepper. Heat reserved tablespoon oil in 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until just smoking. Sear tenderloin until well browned on all sides, 5 to 7 minutes. Transfer to wire rack set in rimmed baking sheet and let rest 10 minutes.

Combine remaining 2 tablespoons horseradish, mayonnaise, and mustard in small bowl. Just before coating tenderloin, add gelatin and stir to combine. Spread horseradish paste on top and sides of meat, leaving bottom and ends bare. Roll coated sides of tenderloin in bread-crumb mixture, pressing gently so crumbs adhere in even layer that just covers horseradish paste; pat off any excess.

Return tenderloin to wire rack. Roast until instant-read thermometer inserted into center of roast registers 120 to 125 degrees for medium-rare, 25 to 30 minutes.

Transfer roast to carving board and let rest 20 minutes. Carefully cut meat crosswise into 1/2-inch-thick slices and serve with horseradish cream sauce (recipe below).


Horseradish Cream Sauce
1/2   cup heavy cream
1/2   cup prepared horseradish
1   teaspoon table salt
1/8   teaspoon pepper, black, ground

Whisk cream in medium bowl until thickened but not yet holding soft peaks, 1 to 2 minutes. Gently fold in horseradish, salt, and pepper. Transfer to serving bowl and refrigerate at least 30 minutes or up to 1 hour before serving.

Offline imref

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2014)
« Reply #77: February 05, 2014, 09:30:48 PM »
made a batch of huge pork tenderloin chops I bought at costco, each chop was about 2" thick.  I coated them in flour mixed with montreal steak seasoning, browned them on both sides in olive oil, then chucked them in a 400 degree oven for about 25 minutes.  They came out wonderful, cooked to an internal temperature of 165 and allowed to rest for about 10 minutes before serving.

Offline Ali the Baseball Cat

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2014)
« Reply #78: February 05, 2014, 10:37:59 PM »
Pork tenderloin is awesome in the oven.  Winter go-to dish. 

Offline 1995hoo

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2014)
« Reply #79: February 05, 2014, 10:51:08 PM »
Agreed, and I love using Montreal steak seasoning on pork. I've used the McCormick brand Montreal steak marinade with pork before cooking it on the grill and it always comes out nicely.

That reminds me that I need to go get one of the propane tanks filled. Tried to light the grill last week and it wouldn't light.

Offline JCA-CrystalCity

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2014)
« Reply #80: February 06, 2014, 12:53:43 PM »
good luck with the price of your propane.

Where is Hank Hill when you need your propane connection?

Offline Mathguy

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Offline Ali the Baseball Cat

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2014)
« Reply #82: February 11, 2014, 11:55:21 PM »
That looks good, though one might want to consider doubling the vodka to keep the cook on point when handling broccoli. 
This makes a great Havarti Cheese Sauce
http://hautecuisinefortheeverydaycook.blogspot.com/2010/02/broccoli-and-havarti-match-made-in.html

Offline saltydad

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2014)
« Reply #83: February 20, 2014, 12:22:45 AM »
I also love the Montreal Steak Spicy lend. I used to make thick pork chops with a tarragon, brandy and cream sauce. Outstanding!

Offline Mathguy

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2014)
« Reply #84: February 20, 2014, 10:19:04 AM »
Buffalo Wing Meatballs with Ranch Dip

Prep: 20 minutes
Cook: 15 minutes

Ingredients:
1 lb. raw lean ground turkey (7% fat or less)
1 cup shredded carrots, finely chopped
1/2 cup finely chopped onion
1/3 cup Cayenne Pepper sauce (I like Siracha Sauce)
2 tbsp. fat-free liquid egg substitute (like Egg Beaters Original) or just use an egg
1/2 tsp. garlic powder
1/8 tsp. black pepper
1/2 cup fat-free plain Greek yogurt
2 1/4 tsp. ranch dressing/seasoning mix

Directions:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray a baking sheet with nonstick spray.

In a large bowl, thoroughly mix all ingredients except yogurt and ranch seasoning. Firmly and evenly form into 24 meatballs, and place them evenly spaced on the baking sheet.


Bake for 10 minutes. 



Gently flip meatballs. Bake until cooked through, about 5 minutes.

Meanwhile, mix Greek yogurt with ranch seasoning until uniform.

Serve meatballs with dip. Enjoy!

Offline Frau Mau

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2014)
« Reply #85: February 20, 2014, 10:51:11 AM »
Wow, that sounds delicious!

Offline lastobjective

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2014)
« Reply #86: February 23, 2014, 04:23:34 PM »
Made a crapton of kimchi on Friday. Fermented it for about a day and a half and it's incredibly delicious. And MUCH cheaper than buying it yourself- not to mention it tastes better (in my opinion!)



Just FYI- those "small" containers are 8 cups.

Recipe: http://www.maangchi.com/recipe/easy-kimchi

Offline tomterp

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2014)
« Reply #87: February 23, 2014, 04:53:49 PM »
I thought you were supposed to bury it in the yard for a couple of months, then scrape the rotted stuff off the top until get down to something not quite as rotten, then serve    :shrug: 

Are you sure this was aged properly?    :lol:

Offline Slateman

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2014)
« Reply #88: February 23, 2014, 05:01:31 PM »
So, uh, the Red, Hot, and Blue in Fairfax is pretty mediocre.

Online houston-nat

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2014)
« Reply #89: February 23, 2014, 05:21:32 PM »
lastobjective, so great to have you back on WNFF!

Tonight I'm making bacon spinach kale mushroom whateverelseisinmyfridge risotto.

Offline lastobjective

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2014)
« Reply #90: February 23, 2014, 05:30:38 PM »
I thought you were supposed to bury it in the yard for a couple of months, then scrape the rotted stuff off the top until get down to something not quite as rotten, then serve    :shrug: 

Are you sure this was aged properly?    :lol:
Naw, I like to keep it young and fresh like me :lol:

Nice to be back... ready for the season to start. I will also post more pics when I make some more spectacular things. I've gotten more into breadmaking recently but I have to hand-knead the dough. I look forward to being able to buy a standing mixer.

Offline tomterp

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2014)
« Reply #91: February 23, 2014, 06:14:17 PM »
So, uh, the Red, Hot, and Blue in Fairfax is pretty mediocre.

It's not particularly well run.  Kind of a shame, they have some really great recipes.  The dry ribs are excellent, as are the fried catfish (this is GOOD fried) and potato salad.  Really, substitute the potato salad for fries and you won't be unhappy.

Online houston-nat

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2014)
« Reply #92: March 02, 2014, 11:38:12 AM »
HELP

My boss "volunteered" me to represent our department in a chili cook-off. I've only made chili once, and it was a really good but eccentric recipe. Do any of y'all have a kick-ass chili recipe I can deploy?  The cook-off is Tuesday...

Offline Ali the Baseball Cat

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2014)
« Reply #93: March 02, 2014, 11:42:30 AM »
Real chili has no recipe...feel the force, Houston

Offline lastobjective

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2014)
« Reply #94: March 02, 2014, 11:58:29 AM »
Well if you need a recipe, I love pretty much all of the ones listed here : http://whatscookingamerica.net/History/Chili/ChiliRecipes.htm

Chasen's Famous Chili is my personal favorite, but it's a really traditional one. Tolbert's Original Bowl of Red and Randy's Chili look interesting, but I've never tried making them.

Offline JCA-CrystalCity

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2014)
« Reply #95: March 02, 2014, 01:08:13 PM »
Dumbass question. I've got an electric range oven with a self cleaning cycle.  I've never used the oven in 3 years in my unit.  Prior owner left some carbony-like stuff on the bottom of the oven that I did not have time to have then clean before I bought.  I suppose what I should do is first try some soap and water cleaning first, but is there anything I should watch for on the self-cleaning cycle?  I assume the self-cleaning shuts off after a time, right?

The oven is in working order.  my home inspector checked it.  I'm just thinking I may want to use the thing.

Offline blue911

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2014)
« Reply #96: March 02, 2014, 01:13:49 PM »
Dumbass question. I've got an electric range oven with a self cleaning cycle.  I've never used the oven in 3 years in my unit.  Prior owner left some carbony-like stuff on the bottom of the oven that I did not have time to have then clean before I bought.  I suppose what I should do is first try some soap and water cleaning first, but is there anything I should watch for on the self-cleaning cycle?  I assume the self-cleaning shuts off after a time, right?

The oven is in working order.  my home inspector checked it.  I'm just thinking I may want to use the thing.

That carbony stuff is carbon. Wipe down the inside of the oven and use it.

Offline JCA-CrystalCity

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2014)
« Reply #97: March 02, 2014, 01:20:47 PM »
like I said, I'm a dumbass.  I'll at least have a better idea what is caked on and what does not come up after I do that.

Offline imref

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2014)
« Reply #98: March 02, 2014, 01:22:30 PM »
like I said, I'm a dumbass.  I'll at least have a better idea what is caked on and what does not come up after I do that.

if you are going to run a self-cleaning cycle, do it on a day when you can open some windows.

Offline imref

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2014)
« Reply #99: March 02, 2014, 01:23:15 PM »
Made a crapton of kimchi on Friday. Fermented it for about a day and a half and it's incredibly delicious. And MUCH cheaper than buying it yourself- not to mention it tastes better (in my opinion!)

(Image removed from quote.)

Just FYI- those "small" containers are 8 cups.

Recipe: http://www.maangchi.com/recipe/easy-kimchi

that looks really good, but can you eat it all before it goes bad or do you give some away?