Author Topic: Baseball America - Top 10 Nats Prospects for 2014  (Read 4783 times)

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Offline comish4lif

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Baseball America - Top 10 Nats Prospects for 2014
« Topic Start: November 06, 2013, 03:25:47 PM »
TOP 10 PROSPECTS
1. Lucas Giolito, rhp
2. A.J. Cole, rhp
3. Brian Goodwin, of
4. Matt Skole, 1b/3b
5. Robbie Ray, lhp
6. Sammy Solis, lhp
7. Michael Taylor, of
8. Jake Johansen, rhp
9. Nate Karns, rhp
10. Steven Souza, of

Offline natasaurus

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Re: Baseball America - Top 10 Nats Prospects for 2014
« Reply #1: November 06, 2013, 04:19:49 PM »
Regarding Michael Taylor, I found this very interesting.  It probably also makes the choice about adding him to the 40-man pretty clear.

Quote
The Future: If Taylor can become even a below-average hitter, his other tools could give him big league value. If he can mature into a fringy or average hitter, he can be an all-star. Next year will be a big test, as he’ll get his first taste of upper-level pitching in Double-A.

Offline HalfSmokes

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Re: Baseball America - Top 10 Nats Prospects for 2014
« Reply #2: November 06, 2013, 04:25:50 PM »
http://www.wnff.net/index.php?topic=30186.msg1323298#msg1323298

interesting comparison, and very little agreement after the top 3

Offline sph274

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Re: Baseball America - Top 10 Nats Prospects for 2014
« Reply #3: November 06, 2013, 04:27:11 PM »
anyone wanna copy and paste? ehh??   :P

Offline zimm_da_kid

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Re: Baseball America - Top 10 Nats Prospects for 2014
« Reply #4: November 06, 2013, 04:40:09 PM »
Regarding Michael Taylor, I found this very interesting.  It probably also makes the choice about adding him to the 40-man pretty clear.


He sounds like an outfield version of espi

Offline RD

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Re: Baseball America - Top 10 Nats Prospects for 2014
« Reply #5: November 06, 2013, 05:11:23 PM »
Kind of a surprise to see Skoles ranking with effectively a lost year this year.

Also surprised to not see Drew Ward or Purke there.While Souza did take a step up this year, I think Purke and Wards upside are higher. Thought Ward was our most talented prospect of our drsft picks this year, so I'd rank him ahead of Johansen as well.

Offline natasaurus

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Re: Baseball America - Top 10 Nats Prospects for 2014
« Reply #6: November 06, 2013, 05:12:02 PM »
anyone wanna copy and paste? ehh??   :P

Here you go:

After snapping the franchise’s 31-year postseason drought in 2012, the Nationals headed into 2013 as a popular pick to win the World Series. But Washington scuffled out of the gate and played .500 ball for the season’s first three months, then went into a tailspin in July. The low point came on Aug. 7, when Washington found itself six games below .500 and 151⁄2 games out of first place.

For much of the season, the Nats were too reliant upon home runs to score, but they evolved into a more efficient offense down the stretch and finished 32-16. Core players Ian Desmond, Ryan Zimmerman and Jayson Werth all finished with strong seasons, while sophomore Bryce Harper turned in a historically good season for a 20-year-old despite a nagging hip injury.

Washington still has one of the best young cores in baseball, and a strong case can be made that they landed the best player available in four consecutive drafts. Having the No. 1 pick in back-to-back seasons helped, as Stephen Strasburg and Harper have thus far lived up to their lofty billing. Anthony Rendon was rated as the top prospect for the 2011 draft but slipped to the Nats at No. 6 because of injury concerns. Rendon finally stayed healthy in 2013 and turned in an impressive rookie season despite learning to play second base on the fly.

In 2012, Washington once again pounced on an elite talent who slid in the draft because of injury and signability issues. Righthander Lucas Giolito had Tommy John surgery shortly after signing for a $2.9 million bonus as the 16th pick, but he returned to action in 2013 and showed the kind of dazzling stuff that gives him a Strasburg-esque ceiling.

Opportunistic drafting clearly has played a big role in Washington’s surge, but the player-development staff also deserves credit for developing homegrown talents like Desmond, Ross Detwiler and Taylor Jordan, who turned in an encouraging nine-start run in his big league debut.

After sending numerous young stars to the big leagues in recent years, Washington’s farm system has been left somewhat depleted. The return of righthander A.J. Cole—traded away in the Gio Gonzalez deal but re-acquired from the Athletics last offseason in the three-team Michael Morse trade—helped immensely. Cole thrived in his return to the organization and established himself as one of Washington’s top prospects. Brian Goodwin, Robbie Ray, Nate Karns and Steven Souza all joined Cole in spending meaningful time in Double-A last year, and any of them could contribute in Washington soon.

The Nationals are also starting to reap rewards from their rejuvenated Latin American program. Exciting young talents like Jefry Rodriguez and Rafael Bautista had sterling U.S. debuts, helping the Rookie-level Gulf Coast League Nationals put together an incredible 49-9 season.

After essentially starting over from scratch three and a half years ago, Washington is now spending money again in Latin America, highlighted by the $900,000 bonus it doled out for 16-year-old Dominican third baseman Anderson Franco in August. It has been a long time since Washington has been a player on the market for pricy international free agents, so this development is one more sign that the franchise is healthier than ever.

1. Lucas Giolito, rhp

Born: July 14, 1994.

B-T: R-R.

Ht.: 6-6.

Wt.: 225.

Drafted: HS—Studio City, Calif., 2012 (1st round).

Signed by: Mark Baca.

Background: Giolito dazzled in the fall and winter of his senior year at Harvard-Westlake High, prompting some scouts to suggest he had a chance to be the best high school righthander in draft history. He regularly ran his fastball up to 99 mph that January and February, but he sprained the ulnar collateral ligament in his elbow in early March, ending his season and transforming him into a draft wild card. The son of Hollywood actors Lindsay Frost and Rick Giolito, Lucas made it clear a hefty bonus would be required to sign him away from a UCLA commitment. The price tag, coupled with the injury, caused Giolito to fall to the Nationals at No. 16, and they signed him for $2,925,000, exceeding his assigned pick value by $800,000. He made one pro appearance in 2012 before having Tommy John surgery on Aug. 31, but he returned to game action about 10 months later in the Rookie-level Gulf Coast League, where his stuff was as electric as ever.

Scouting Report: The first three pitches out of Giolito’s hand in his 2013 GCL debut were 100 mph fastballs. His fastball routinely ranges from 93-100 with exceptional downhill angle, and he learned by the end of the summer that he was more comfortable and had better command when he sat at 95-97, rather than reaching back for triple digits all the time. Between his velocity and his angle, Giolito’s fastball rates as a true 80 pitch on the 20-80 scouting scale, and he does it with minimal effort. He also throws a 12-to-6 power curveball in the 84-86 range that Nationals pitching coordinator Spin Williams has called one of the best curves he’s ever seen when Giolito throws a good one. It has late bite and excellent depth, projecting as a plus-plus pitch with a chance to be a second 80 offering. Giolito is still learning to control his 6-foot-6 body, and his delivery is not always in sync. When he throws his 82-83 mph changeup with conviction, it flashes plus, but it remains a work in progress. Giolito also stands out for his competitive mound demeanor and tireless work ethic.

The Future: Giolito has a real chance to become a No. 1 starter in the big leagues, because his repertoire is electrifying and his feel for pitching is fairly advanced for his age. The Nationals have a great track record with building pitchers back up after Tommy John surgery—former No. 1 prospects Jordan Zimmermann and Stephen Strasburg both overcame the procedure to become stars. The next step is proving he can handle a full-season workload. He figures to start 2014 at low Class A Hagerstown, and if he dominates as expected, he could move quickly.



2. A.J. Cole, rhp

Born: Jan. 5, 1992.

B-T: R-R.

Ht.: 6-4.

Wt.: 180.

Drafted: HS—Oviedo, Fla., 2010 (4th round).

Signed by: Paul Tinnell.

Background: The Nationals signed Cole for a fourth-round-record $2 million bonus in 2010, then traded him to Oakland in the Gio Gonzalez deal after the 2011 season. He spent one year with the Athletics, struggling in high Class A but dominating back in low A, then returned to the Nationals in the March 2013 Michael Morse deal. Cole’s stock soared after he earned a late-July promotion to Double-A Harrisburg and made seven strong starts, lasting at least six full innings in each of them.

Scouting Report: Cole pitches predominantly off his explosive fastball, which sits at 94-95 mph and regularly touches 97. His fastball command is solid, but it remains better to his arm side than his glove side. His second pitch is a fringe-average changeup that flashes plus when he maintains his arm speed. The biggest knock on Cole is his lack of a wipeout breaking ball, but he worked hard to tighten it up and add some power to it this year. Sometimes it looks like a short curveball, other times he gets on the side of it and it’s more of a slider. The shape and depth of the pitch are inconsistent, and so is the velocity, which ranges from 75-82 mph.

The Future: Cole needs to refine his offspeed stuff, but he should get a shot in Triple-A in 2014. He could get a big league callup by season’s end and projects as a mid-rotation starter.



3. Brian Goodwin, of

Born: Nov. 2, 1990.

B-T: L-L.

Ht.: 6-1.

Wt.: 195.

Drafted: Miami Dade JC, 2011 (1st round supplemental).

Signed by: Alex Morales.

Background: After signing for $3 million in 2011, Goodwin reached Double-A by the second half of 2012, but he has struggled at that level for the last year and a half. He hit just .204 against Double-A lefties in 2013, but he showed a more disciplined approach in the final month, posting a 13-10 walk-strikeout mark in August after drawing 53 walks and fanning 109 times over the first four months.

Scouting Report: Goodwin has tantalizing five-tool ability. His best tool is his speed, which rates as a 65 on the 20-80 scale, but he still needs to refine his routes in center field and his basestealing acumen. Thanks to iffy instincts, not all scouts are sold he can play center, but he has a chance to be a solid-average defender with an average arm. Goodwin has plenty of bat speed and average power potential, but he still has work to do at the plate. He has worked to eliminate the double toe tap that disrupted his timing, but his approach can still be segmented, causing his swing to be late. If he can get himself into better hitting position more consistently, he could become a slightly above-average hitter, because his hands really work.

The Future: Some evaluators think Goodwin has all-star potential, while others view him as a borderline regular or even an extra outfielder. His likeliest outcome lies somewhere in between. He figures to reach Triple-A in 2014 and could compete for a big league job by 2015.



4. Matt Skole, 1b/3b

Born: July 30, 1989.

B-T: L-R.

Ht.: 6-4.

Wt.: 220.

Drafted: Georgia Tech, 2011 (5th round).

Signed by: Eric Robinson.

Background: Skole won South Atlantic League MVP honors and was named Washington’s minor league hitter of the year in 2012. His 2013 season was cut short in his second game when he collided with a runner while playing first base, causing a microfracture in his wrist and severing the ulnar collateral ligament in his non-throwing elbow. He had Tommy John surgery and wrist surgery but returned to action in the Arizona Fall League, where he homered twice in his first four games.

Scouting Report: Skole’s calling card is his plus lefthanded power, primarily to the pull side. He has a flicker with his bat head right before letting loose on the baseball, and he generates serious bat speed. The Nationals helped him get more out of his huge frame by minimizing his leg kick, solidifying his base and improving his balance. He showed an improved ability to stay back and drive breaking pitches the other way in his last healthy season. Skole also has an advanced feel for the strike zone, giving him a chance to be an average or slightly better hitter. He has good hands at either infield corner and a solid arm, but he lacks the range to displace Ryan Zimmerman or Anthony Rendon at the hot corner, so he figures to focus on first base going forward.

The Future: Skole will return to Harrisburg to start 2014. He is the best power prospect in the system and could be the organization’s first baseman of the future.


5. Robbie Ray, lhp

Born: Oct. 1, 1991.

B-T: L-L.

Ht.: 6-2.

Wt.: 170.

Drafted: HS—Brentwood, Tenn., 2010 (12th round).

Signed by: Paul Faulk.

Background: Ray first made a name for himself by flashing mid-90s heat on the high school showcase circuit, but he pitched mostly in the 87-91 mph range over his first three pro seasons. But his velocity jumped in 2013, and his prospect status jumped with it. He ranked as the No. 16 prospect in the high Class A Carolina League, and he more than held his own as a 21-year-old in the Double-A Eastern League following a midseason promotion.

Scouting Report: Ray attacks hitters primarily with his heater, which ranges from 91-96 mph, averaging about 93. His arm still drags at times, causing his release point and command to be inconsistent, but he is a good athlete with a loose arm, prompting scouts to project his command as at least average. His changeup came along nicely in 2013, showing flashes of being a slightly above-average pitch in the low 80s. He throws a short slurve that ranges from 74-79 mph, and too many of them are tumblers with loose spin, rating as 35 pitches. His best ones are average, but the pitch still has a long way to go.

The Future: Ray’s plus fastball, athleticism and durable frame give him a chance to be a mid-rotation starter if he can develop his breaking ball. That remains a significant question mark, but he’ll continue to work on the pitch as a 22-year-old in Double-A next year.



6. Sammy Solis, lhp

Born: Aug. 10, 1988.

B-T: R-L.

Ht.: 6-5.

Wt.: 230.

Drafted: San Diego, 2010 (2nd round).

Signed by: Tim Reynolds.

Background: Staying healthy has been an issue for Solis since his college days, but his body and stuff tantalize when he is on the mound. He missed almost all of 2009 at San Diego with a herniated disc in his back, then saw his first full pro season in 2011 delayed by a quadriceps injury. He missed all of 2012 after having Tommy John surgery, but he returned to action in May and looked stronger than ever.

Scouting Report: Right before he injured his elbow, Solis had touched 96-97 mph, but his comfort zone this year was 89-93, touching 95 early in games. His fastball has natural tail and run, and he has solid command of it. His No. 2 pitch is usually his changeup, which projects as a slightly above-average to plus offering, but there are days his slurvy breaking ball can be the more effective pitch. The three-quarters breaking ball is still somewhat inconsistent, sometimes flashing solid-average but other times rating as a slightly below-average pitch. Solis has a good delivery, a physical frame and an unflappable demeanor on the mound.

The Future: With a chance for three average to plus pitches, Solis has a chance to be a No. 4 starter in the majors, if he can stay healthy. He’s already 25 and has not yet reached Double-A, so the Nationals figure to push him in 2014, starting with an assignment to Harrisburg.



7. Michael Taylor, of

Born: March 26, 1991.

B-T: R-R.

Ht.: 6-4.

Wt.: 205.

Drafted: HS—Fort Lauderdale, Fla., 2009 (6th round).

Signed by: Tony Arango.

Background: Drafted as a shortstop, Taylor took to center field in a hurry and made himself into a legitimate prospect based primarily on his spectacular defense. After struggling offensively in high Class A in 2012, he repeated the level in 2013 and made major gains, hitting for more power and making better use of his speed by stealing 51 bases in 58 tries.

Scouting Report: The wiry, quick-twitch Taylor earns frequent physical comparisons to Mike Cameron and Adam Jones, and one scout said his ability to go back on balls in center field evokes Jim Edmonds. He’s a plus runner with plus-plus range thanks to his outstanding reads and jumps, and his plus arm is accurate. He made huge strides with his baserunning, demonstrating good leads, reads and jumps. Taylor also has above-average raw power, but scouts have reservations about whether he’ll ever hit enough to unlock it. He has a choppy, disjointed swing and a tendency to get very aggressive with his stride, though he made progress toning it down in instructional league. He still struggles mightily against offspeed stuff, but he can punish fastballs in or over the plate.

The Future: If Taylor can become even a below-average hitter, his other tools could give him big league value. If he can mature into a fringy or average hitter, he can be an all-star. Next year will be a big test, as he’ll get his first taste of upper-level pitching in Double-A.



8. Jake Johansen, rhp

Born: Jan. 23, 1991.

B-T: R-R.

Ht.: 6-6.

Wt.: 235.

Drafted: Dallas Baptist, 2013 (2nd round).

Signed by: Ed Gustafson.

Background: Johansen has been on the scouting radar for years because of his prodigious arm strength, but he never harnessed his potential at Dallas Baptist, where he went 7-6, 5.40 in 15 starts as a fourth-year junior in 2013. The Nationals were pleased to land a player with Johansen’s upside with their top pick (No. 68 overall), and his pro debut in the New York-Penn League was very encouraging.

Scouting Report: The Nationals got Johansen to simplify his approach at Auburn, attacking hitters with power stuff rather than trying to trick them. Though his command and his secondary stuff remain works in progress, Johansen dominated the NY-P with a premium fastball that sat at 94-96 mph with heavy sink and topped out at 99. He arrived in pro ball with a poor 74-77 mph curveball, but he threw it with more power as the summer progressed, coming in at 77-83 with tighter rotation at its best. He also made progress with his 86-90 cutter/slider and showed improving feel for his changeup, but all of his secondary stuff needs refinement.

The Future: The Nats will keep Johansen in a starting role as long as possible, and if everything clicks, he has No. 3 starter upside. He must improve his feel for pitching, and many scouts envision him as a better fit in the back of a bullpen.



9. Nate Karns, rhp

Born: Nov. 25, 1987.

B-T: R-R.

Ht.: 6-3.

Wt.: 230.

Drafted: Texas Tech, 2009 (12th round).

Signed by: Jimmy Gonzales.

Background: Karns recovered from a torn labrum to jump back onto the prospect landscape in 2012, leading the minor leagues in opponent average (.174) in his full-season debut. He followed that up with a strong season in the Double-A Eastern League. Karns made his big league debut in May but was sent back down to Harrisburg after struggling in three starts. He really found his groove upon his return to the EL, posting a 2.57 ERA the rest of the way.

Scouting Report: Physical and aggressive, Karns attacks hitters with a 91-95 mph power sinker, peaking at 98 on occasion. He has a second plus pitch in his wipeout hammer curveball, which ranges from 82-85 mph. He’s still learning to throw the curve for strikes, but he excels at getting hitters to chase it. Karns also has a below-average changeup at 83-85 mph, but his feel for it increased marginally in 2013. He has a long arm action and a stiff front leg, leading to just fair command, though he does throw strikes with his fastball.

The Future: Unless Karns can make significant strides with his command and his third pitch, he profiles best as a big league set-up man. He’ll enter 2014 as a 26-year-old in Triple-A, where he will continue to work as a starter.

   

10. Steven Souza, of

Born: April 24, 1989.

B-T: R-R.

Ht.: 6-3.

Wt.: 220.

Drafted: HS—Everett, Wash., 2007 (3rd round).

Signed by: Doug McMillan.

Background: Maturity issues undermined Souza’s ability to maximize his tantalizing raw talent for the first few years of his career. The low point came in 2010, when he broke his thumb and served a 50-game suspension after testing positive for a performance-enhancing substance. As he grew up, he rejuvenated his career with a breakout 2012 campaign, then performed well in Double-A in 2013, though he missed time with an oblique injury.

Scouting Report: Souza is a physical specimen with multiple loud tools. He has 65 raw power and is capable of hitting home runs from pole to pole. A former third baseman, Souza has found a home as a corner outfielder, where he is a solid-average defender with a plus arm. He’s also a slightly above-average runner with good baserunning instincts. If Souza hits, he has the tool set to be an everyday right fielder. He has done a better job staying in his legs and maintaining a balanced swing, helping him drive the ball to all fields. Souza has serious bat speed and can hit premium velocity, but his swing still has some length, making him vulnerable against offspeed stuff.

The Future: The Nats compare Souza’s career path to that of Michael Morse, and he could have a similar impact as a late-blooming masher. He should advance to Triple-A in 2014.


Offline natasaurus

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Re: Baseball America - Top 10 Nats Prospects for 2014
« Reply #7: November 06, 2013, 05:22:07 PM »
Some chat answers that may be of interest:

Billy Burns and some guys who just missed the list:
Burns is certainly a bona fide prospect, and he was very much in the mix for the No. 10 spot on this list. I wrestled with about four or five candidates for that spot — Souza, Burns, Tony Renda, Zach Walters, maybe Purke or even Pedro Severino. You’ve got to love Burns’ top-of-the-charts speed and his ability to make good use of it. He knows his game and does not try to do too much. It is a Juan Pierre-esque skill set, although some people think Burns is a better defender in left field than center, so maybe Scott Podsednik is a better comparison. Burns does not impact the ball with authority, which certainly limits his ceiling, but he is wise to keep the ball on the ground, and I love that he walks more than he strikes out. He still strikes me as more of a fourth outfielder, but he does have a chance to be an everyday guy.


Taylor Jordan:
PT (IBC): I see Taylor Jordan at #6 behind Cole and ahead of Goodwin in your 25 and under list. Does this mean he would have been #3 on the top ten if he hadn’t graduated? What’s his upside?
Aaron Fitt: That is where I would have slotted him, yes. I like that power sinker/slider combination, and I like that he’s already proven he can get big league hitters out. He does not have Cole’s or Giolito’s upside, but I think he’s a legit No. 4 starter type, maybe a No. 3.

IFA GCL arms:
Aaron Fitt: Disregarding Giolito (who only pitched 22 innings there), the GCL Nats still have a few very intriguing arms. The best of the bunch is Jefry Rodriguez, a converted infielder who can be 93-97 with a promising power curveball, although he has a long way to go. His changeup, delivery and command are all works in progress, and his body needs to mature, but his upside is awfully intriguing, and his debut was encouraging. Wander Suero doesn’t have that kind of live arm, but he has a quality breaking ball; he’s a name to watch. And lefty Hector Silvestre can reach 93-94 and has a projectable 6-foot-4 frame. All three of those guys performed this summer and put themselves on the prospect map.

Drew Ward:
Aaron Fitt: He’s somewhat similar to Matt Skole — a physical corner bat with serious power potential and the ability to control the strike zone. He’s still young and learning to tap into his power, but it will come. Like Skole, I think he’ll probably wind up at first base down the road, but he does have enough arm strength for third. I think he has a chance to hit enough for either position. He’s young yet, but his ceiling is that of a quality everyday player, maybe even a star.

Giolito's awesomeness:
Liam (Dallas): Good lord. 2 80 future grades for Giolito? Are we looking at the #1 pitching prospect in baseball (assuming a healthy season) by the end of next season?
Aaron Fitt: I am comfortable making that kind of prediction. I think this guy is really, really special.




Offline Lintyfresh85

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Re: Baseball America - Top 10 Nats Prospects for 2014
« Reply #8: November 06, 2013, 06:09:32 PM »
Taylor definitely is an intriguing prospect. He's got a funky running motion but he's fast and has the look of a ballplayer.

Offline natasaurus

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Re: Baseball America - Top 10 Nats Prospects for 2014
« Reply #9: November 06, 2013, 06:41:03 PM »
I'm really interested in what Jefry Rodriguez does next year (in A-ball?).  A 20 year old, 6'5" Dominican who can reach the mid-nineties with his fastball seems almost too good to be true. 

There are definitely some exciting young guys in the 11-30 range.

Offline UMDNats

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Wow, high praise for Giolito. Didn't realize he was that special.

Offline Terpfan76

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Wow, high praise for Giolito. Didn't realize he was that special.

Until his arm problems his senior year in HS he was considered the #1 over all pick by a number of sources. This kid has the stuff to be a legit #1 if not a true Ace.

Just to be clear, I'm sure we're all in agreement that all #1s are not created equal?

Offline mitlen

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Offline imref

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Quote
The Future: The Nats compare Souza’s career path to that of Michael Morse, and he could have a similar impact as a late-blooming masher. He should advance to Triple-A in 2014

he's been reading my posts. :-)

Nice to see this list, and how good some of our prospects can be, after we traded a boat load of them away in 2012 for Gio.

Offline natasaurus

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Thanks natasaurus.

You're welcome!  :D

Offline NatMan

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dustin hood?

Offline NJ Ave

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dustin hood?

Still trying to live up to his brother Destin.

Offline comish4lif

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Still trying to live up to his brother Destin.
Destin had a very non-prospecty season in 2013. A .605 OPS at age 23 and repeating the level.

http://www.baseball-reference.com/minors/player.cgi?id=hood--001des


Offline HalfSmokes

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I don't think this is worth a new thread, since it's very related this thread. Serious question, did scouts miss something with Souza and Taylor, is this year out of nowhere, or is this year a fluke for both?

Offline natasaurus

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I don't think this is worth a new thread, since it's very related this thread. Serious question, did scouts miss something with Souza and Taylor, is this year out of nowhere, or is this year a fluke for both?

I think that Souza was considered a sleeper prospect, but probably his age and past issues raised some concerns.

With Taylor, it was always an issue of whether he could hit and get on base because the scouts saw the tools, and he had the speed and defense already, but he wasn't really putting all of his tools together.  They were probably conservative with him even after his solid season last year because they've seen players like him in the past, and some may put it all together, but most probably never live up to their potential. Not only has Taylor been putting up crazy numbers, he's actually been improving each month.

There's also a line between playing over your head and having a breakout season.  So there may be no possible way for either to continue their production at the major league level, but they are dominating their current opposition. We'll see if the opposing pitchers start to adjust to them as the season goes on.

Offline natasaurus

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From BA's hot sheet chat:

Quote
Jason (Houston): Michael Taylor is having a breakout season and appears to be improving his pitch recognition with a decreasing K rate (but still high). Has he surpassed Brian Goodwin on the Nats depth chart and what can we expect from him in the majors?

Vincent Lara-Cinisomo: The consensus in the BA offices is a resounding yes. Taylor is really having the season the Nats dreamed on. His power-speed combo is rare. That swing still is a bit choppy, though, and the strikeouts still come in bunches. As for the majors, it's just so difficult to project. This is his first taste of upper-level pitching and he's doing well. But he could get manhandled by off-speed stuff at the next level and higher.

Offline JCA-CrystalCity

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OK, Player X at ages 21- 23

21 - A+ - .248 / .343 / .391, 6 HR, 538 PAs, 101 Ks, 60 BB
22 - AA - .249 / .355 / .429, 11 HR, 419 PAs,  104 Ks, 54 BBs
23 - AA - .300 / .402 / .600, 28 HR, 563 PAs, 117 Ks, 71 BBs

By 24, he was mostly a full time major leaguer.  6'2", 210 lbs.

Taylor

21 - A+ - .242 / .318 / .362, 3 HR, 431 PAs, 113 K, 40 BB.
22 - A+ - .263 / .340 / .426, 10 HR, 581 PAs, 131 Ks, 55 BBs
23 - AA - .339 / .419 / .602, 17 HR, 293 PAs, 85 Ks, 33 BBs.

6'3", 210.

He is not showing the plate discipline of Mike Cameron at the same level at age 23, but if he continues to show the discipline he has this month going forward, he could end up with close to a 2:1 K:BB.   He's probably not quite as advanced as Cameron at the same age, but he's also probably going to be allowed more experience in the minors and a chance to further develop his plate approach.

Interesting that they both played A+ in Woodbridge.

Is Cameron his upside?


Offline PC

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Nevermind, I just bought it.

1) Lucas Giolito
2) AJ Cole
3) Michael Taylor
4) Brian Goodwin
5) Steven Souza
6) Austin Voth
7) Jake Johansen
8 ) Tony Renda
9) Zach Walters
10) Drew Ward

Offline Natsinpwc

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Nevermind, I just bought it.

1) Lucas Giolito
2) AJ Cole
3) Michael Taylor
4) Brian Goodwin
5) Steven Souza
6) Austin Voth
7) Jake Johansen
8 ) Tony Renda
9) Zach Walters
10) Drew Ward
Cross Zach off that list!