Author Topic: Barves: Knights Templar of Unwritten Rules and gutless anti-American douche bags  (Read 44814 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline whytev

  • Posts: 8768
I absolutely LOVE beating up on this hateful team, and horrid organization...

before mlb.tv, and living where I do, our 'cable' tv stations were Atlanta-based, and so it was pretty much the only 'nationals' games that I could watch back then.

Testify!

Offline nats2playoffs

  • Posts: 21463
Sherman’s Folly at Shiloh
By Winston Groom 2/10/2012
http://www.historynet.com/shermans-folly-at-shiloh.htm

From the time of his arrival at Pittsburg Landing [General William T. Sherman] refused even to entertain the possibility of an attack by the large Rebel army known to be converging just 20 miles south at Corinth, Mississippi...  By some amazing blunder, the most inexperienced divisions—those of Sherman and Brigadier General Benjamin M. Prentiss—were placed in the outer lines at the maw of the cornucopia, close to the Rebel army at Corinth... The various camps to the south along the cornucopia’s mouth were not even set in a continuous line but placed helter-skelter with huge, heavily forested gaps in between.

Even worse, neither Sherman nor Grant nor anyone else had made the slightest attempt to entrench or erect fortifications, which in all probability would have deterred a Confederate attack. Instead, they spent their days teaching the men drill formations in the farm fields and holding spit-and-polish dress parades... Since the position was protected on both flanks by water, if either Grant or Sherman had told the engineers that the mouth of the cornucopia must be strongly fortified with embrasures, protected batteries, headlogs, abatis, with cleared fields of fire and other expedient military architecture, the encampment would have been nearly impregnable. But this was not done, and great blame attaches to Grant, and to a lesser extent Sherman...

On April 4, 1862...a captain and two sergeants from the 77th Ohio [the unit that included mitlin's GGGrandfather] strolled away from their camp to visit a cotton plantation about a quarter mile to the south. As they reached a line of trees, they beheld across a field “the enemy in force, and to all appearances they were getting breakfast. We saw infantry, cavalry, and artillery very plainly.” The captain sent one of the sergeants dashing to Sherman’s headquarters, but by this time Sherman was so annoyed that he ordered the sergeant arrested for sounding a false alarm! 

Shortly after 7 a.m., Sherman and his staff rode out into an open field (now known as Rhea Field, after the farmer who owned it) in front of the 53rd Ohio, Colonel Appler’s bothersome regiment... the general halted to take out his spyglass and study what appeared to be a large body of enemy troops marching diagonally across the south end of the field half a mile away. Someone in Appler’s regiment suddenly glimpsed a line of Rebel skirmishers emerge from the brush close on Sherman’s right, opposite from the direction he was looking. They halted and raised their weapons to aim. A warning was shouted, but not in time. Sherman started and threw up his hands before his face, exclaiming, “My God, we are attacked!” An instant later the flash and crash of fire from the Rebel volley killed Sherman’s orderly next to him—blew him off his horse and onto the ground, where he lay on his back spouting blood. Sherman himself was struck in the hand, apparently by buckshot, then wheeled his horse with the rest of his staff, dashing away from the field, yelling to Appler as he passed, “Hold your position, I will support you.”

BECAUSE HE HAD consistently sneered at reports of an enemy attack, Sherman was forced to eat his words...Having watched his own orderly shot dead before his eyes (“the fatal bullet,” he said later, “which was meant for me”), Sherman galloped back to his headquarters at the Shiloh church, sounding the alarm to nearby commanders and sending warnings to divisions encamped in the rear, a mile or so north.


With Sherman on the run, Confederates capture the camp of Union general John McClernand on the first day of the battle. (Paul Fleury Mottelay and T. Campbell-Copeland, The Soldier in Our Civil War: A Pictorial History of the Conflict, 1861–1865, New York: S. Bradley Pub. Co, 1893)

Fallen Timbers, April 8, 1862
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Shiloh
On April 8, 1862 Grant sent Sherman south along the Corinth Road on a reconnaissance in force to confirm that the Confederates had retreated, or to see if they were regrouping to resume their attacks...  Skirmishers from the 77th Ohio Infantry approached a camp of 300 troopers of Confederate cavalry, commanded by Col. Nathan Bedford Forrest. Forrest was nearly captured and was seriously wounded..  The Union lost about 100 men, most of them captured during Forrest's charge

Offline imref

  • Posts: 24295
  • 1B: The New Hot Corner
Sherman's problem at Shiloh was that Lincoln wouldn't give him enough backup resources after his front-line tired, usually five or six hours into battle, or in the case of the unit commanded by Lt. Gonzales, 4-5 hours after firing many missed shots.

Offline dracnal

  • Posts: 1001
Sherman's problem at Shiloh was that Lincoln wouldn't give him enough backup resources after his front-line tired, usually five or six hours into battle, or in the case of the unit commanded by Lt. Gonzales, 4-5 hours after firing many missed shots.

I'm not saying you're wrong because I don't know much about the Civil War, but are you sure it was Lincoln that wouldn't give reserves after his soldiers tired? It seems really odd for a president to be dictating troop allocation mid-battle. Denying the reserves beforehand or the General (Grant probably?) not assigning them I can see happening. Just really odd to think that battlefield tactics were managed by telegraph.

Online varoadking

  • Posts: 19296
Just really odd to think that battlefield tactics were managed by telegraph.

Twitter, dude...

Offline dracnal

  • Posts: 1001
Twitter, dude...

It's sad that it isn't automatically a joke when you say that.

Offline imref

  • Posts: 24295
  • 1B: The New Hot Corner
I'm not saying you're wrong because I don't know much about the Civil War, but are you sure it was Lincoln that wouldn't give reserves after his soldiers tired? It seems really odd for a president to be dictating troop allocation mid-battle. Denying the reserves beforehand or the General (Grant probably?) not assigning them I can see happening. Just really odd to think that battlefield tactics were managed by telegraph.

oh Lord, re-read what I wrote, and apply it to the current state of Washington baseball.  :)


Offline dracnal

  • Posts: 1001
oh Lord, re-read what I wrote, and apply it to the current state of Washington baseball.  :)

Wow. That one went right past me the first time I read it. Nicely done and funny when read properly. :clap:

Offline JCA-CrystalCity

  • Global Moderator
  • ****
  • Posts: 23949
  • Platoon - not just a movie, a baseball obsession
Sherman's problem at Shiloh was that Lincoln wouldn't give him enough backup resources after his front-line tired, usually five or six hours into battle, or in the case of the unit commanded by Lt. Gonzales, 4-5 hours after firing many missed shots.
I'm not sure I agree with the whole tiring thing.  I think it was General Carl Schurz [http://www.rocemabra.com/~roger/tagg/generals/general29.html], who was quite a sharpshooter himself and would insist on lasting the whole fight and not allowing his troops to be relieved on the verge of victory. His biggest problem when he was in charge was the occasional having his performance marred by Confederate long-shot cannon fire.

Offline imref

  • Posts: 24295
  • 1B: The New Hot Corner
I'm not sure I agree with the whole tiring thing.  I think it was General Carl Schurz [http://www.rocemabra.com/~roger/tagg/generals/general29.html], who was quite a sharpshooter himself and would insist on lasting the whole fight and not allowing his troops to be relieved on the verge of victory. His biggest problem when he was in charge was the occasional having his performance marred by Confederate long-shot cannon fire.

well done :clap:

Offline The Chief

  • Posts: 30589
  • it's a thumb
    • http://www.wnff.net
Something something the Union didn't know how to play small ball.

Offline JCA-CrystalCity

  • Global Moderator
  • ****
  • Posts: 23949
  • Platoon - not just a movie, a baseball obsession
Something something the Union didn't know how to play small ball.
hey, they had Abner Freakin' Doubleday.  Who the heck was going to tell him how to play?

Offline OldChelsea

  • Posts: 7219
  • From the best seat in the house at Nationals Park
Last night the Phillies completed a four-match swep of the Braves...and I wonder if some of that unique blend of inbred BillyBobs and phony sophisticates (left over from the superstation days) ever thought of how things might have been if they could have registered more wins against the team currently holding the NL's second-worst record...2-9 overall, 0-7 at Citizens Bank Park.

Oh well, it was just a thought. Serves those fans right.

Offline OldChelsea

  • Posts: 7219
  • From the best seat in the house at Nationals Park
Braves play 'Rock You Like a Hurricane' during yesterday's Marlins match, later apologise: http://www.good4utah.com/news/weird/braves-play-rock-you-like-a-hurricane-during-marlins-game/806896117


Offline mitlen

  • Posts: 52203
  • We had 'em all the way.
That's awkward ....

Maybe when they come here next week, we can play "Marching Through Georgia".

Offline JCA-CrystalCity

  • Global Moderator
  • ****
  • Posts: 23949
  • Platoon - not just a movie, a baseball obsession
Maybe when they come here next week, we can play "Marching Through Georgia".
Have Tribute to William Tecumseh Sherman night with a descendant throwing out the first pitch. Have Abe set fire to a model the city.

Offline RiotAct

  • Posts: 1136
Have Tribute to William Tecumseh Sherman night with a descendant throwing out the first pitch. Have Abe set fire to a model the city.

 :hysterical:

Offline mitlen

  • Posts: 52203
  • We had 'em all the way.
Have Tribute to William Tecumseh Sherman night with a descendant throwing out the first pitch. Have Abe set fire to a model the city.

That's the spirit.     :hurr:     Or as we said in the 1860s, "Huzzah".

Offline JCA-CrystalCity

  • Global Moderator
  • ****
  • Posts: 23949
  • Platoon - not just a movie, a baseball obsession
That's the spirit.     :hurr:     Or as we said in the 1860s, "Huzzah".

Offline mitlen

  • Posts: 52203
  • We had 'em all the way.

Offline aspenbubba

  • Posts: 3570
When the Braves come here on Tuesday I think the fans in the stadium should give Lane Adams a standing ovation.

Offline whytev

  • Posts: 8768
When the Braves come here on Tuesday I think the fans in the stadium should give Lane Adams a standing ovation.

I bet they do.

Offline Ali the Baseball Cat

  • Posts: 14363
  • babble on
I'll be there tomorrow...not sure about the standing ovation bit, but maybe a respectful slow clap and then a full 4 innings grace before resuming the jeering  :P 

Offline mitlen

  • Posts: 52203
  • We had 'em all the way.
Full throated, "Booooooooooooooooooooooooo  !!"