Author Topic: I need help!  (Read 258 times)

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Offline daaskins

  • Posts: 83
I need help!
« Topic Start: June 17, 2012, 01:37:39 PM »
can someone explain to me how it works when you demote someone to AAA. I kind of get it how everyone gets a shot to claim them before they go down but how does it work. What are the different ways it happens? I know that if we put harper down someone could not claim him.. So how doees it work?


Offline RobDibblesGhost

  • Posts: 27171
Re: I need help!
« Reply #1: June 17, 2012, 01:43:35 PM »
From Wikipedia:

Quote
Options

A common misconception, due to the phrasing of "out of options," is that a player may only be moved between the major and minor leagues a finite number of times. On the contrary, a player has a finite number of option years in which he may be moved between the major and minor leagues an unlimited number of times. If a player is on the 40-man roster but not on the active major league roster, he is said to be on optional assignment—his organization may freely move him between the major league club and the minor league club. The rules for this are as follows. (In all cases, an assignment of a player on a major-league disabled list to the minors while on a rehabilitation assignment does not count as time spent in the minors.)

    Once a player has been placed on a team's 40-man roster, a team has 3 option years on that player.
        A player is considered to have used one of those three option years when he spends at least 20 days in the minors in any of those 3 seasons.
    A team may have a fourth option year on a player with less than five full seasons of professional experience, provided that both conditions are met below.
        A player has not spent at least 90 days on an active professional roster in a season. Minor leagues that play below Class A Advanced have seasons that are shorter than 90 days, and as such, any player who spends a full season in a rookie or Class A (short-season) league will receive a fourth option year.
        A player has not spent at least 60 days on an active professional roster AND then at least 30 days on a disabled list in a season. Only after 60 days have been spent on an active professional roster does time spent on the disabled list count towards the 90-day threshold. As with the prior example, this cannot occur with players who spend a full season in a rookie or Class A (short season) league.

Once all of the options have been used up on a player, a player is considered "out of options" and a player must be placed on and clear waivers prior to being sent down to the minor leagues (there is also the "veterans' consent rule; see below). Additionally, three years after the date of a player’s first appearance on a major-league roster, he must clear optional waivers (which are revocable) to be optioned even if he has options remaining.

Designated for assignment

A player who is designated for assignment is immediately removed from the 40-man roster. This gives the team time to decide what to do with the player while freeing up a roster spot for another transaction, if needed. Once a player is designated for assignment, the team has ten days to do one of the following things: the player can be traded, the player can be released, or the player can be put on waivers and, provided he clears, outrighted to the minors. A player who is outrighted to the minors is removed from the 40-man roster but is still paid according to the terms of his guaranteed contract. A player can only be outrighted once in his career without his consent.

Veterans' consent

If a player has 5 years of major-league service, he may not be assigned to a minor-league team without his consent, regardless of whether he has already been outrighted once, even if he clears waivers. If the player withholds consent, the team must either release him or keep him on the major league roster. In either case, the player must continue to be paid under the terms of his contract. If he is released and signs with a new team, his previous team must pay the difference in salary between the two contracts if the previous contract called for a greater salary.

Offline HalfSmokes

  • Posts: 18699
Re: I need help!
« Reply #2: June 17, 2012, 01:47:29 PM »
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Major_League_Baseball_transactions#section_3 is a good explanation if you want to go in depth, more simplely, so long as a player has option years left (ie young guys) they can be moved between MLB and aaa, if they are out of options, the get dfa'd, and they can either accept or refuse the assignment.

Offline comish4lif

  • Posts: 2841
  • Too Stressed to care.
Re: I need help!
« Reply #3: June 18, 2012, 07:44:32 AM »
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Major_League_Baseball_transactions#section_3 is a good explanation if you want to go in depth, more simplely, so long as a player has option years left (ie young guys) they can be moved between MLB and aaa, if they are out of options, the get dfa'd, and they can either accept or refuse the assignment.
That's not correct, if a player is out of options, he has to clear waivers to get sent down and another team can claim him. If a team wants to take that player off the 40 man roster, he'd also have to clear waivers. When a player gets DFA'd, the club has 10 days to resolve it - via trade, waiver or demotion.