Author Topic: Harper's Double in Atlanta Tied to Climate Change  (Read 474 times)

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Offline PowerBoater69

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Quote
Bryce Harper’s Unusual Hit Speaks to Climate Change Impacts
from Wildlife Promise

Climate change is often a subtle devil.  While in 2011 we witnessed $35 billion in insured losses from climate change-fueled extreme weather, many of the other impacts progress incrementally each year until they accumulate enough to be noticed, or even worse, we start accepting them as the everyday norm. And sometimes an innocuous event can provide a window into how climate change is already impacting the everyday in ways we don’t even think about.

Take baseball. Two weekends ago, one window into climate change impacts opened up in Atlanta. During a 8-4 victory, Nationals rookie phenom Bryce Harper hit an apparently ordinary single into right field against the Braves. Harper, however, hustled around first base as an unsuspecting and nonchalant Jason Heyward mishandled the ball. Harper roared into second with a double–a highlight reel play. Great play by the kid, but what could this possibly have to do with climate change?

In reviewing the play, Nationals’ announcer F.P. Santangelo talked about how the ball “snaked” (rolling in an unusual direction on the dry grass) on Heyward and caused him to misplay it. Other players like Miami’s Giancarlo Stanton have also complained of the ball “snaking” in the Atlanta outfield. Santangelo continued to explain that there are recurring grass problems at Turner Field as the grounds crew tries to deal with extreme weather in Atlanta.

What about Heyward’s play on the Harper single when he took extra base?

“I think the ball snaked on him and it popped up, and Harper just kept running, kept running with his head up. We’ve got it in the reports that this guy runs everything out – hard. We misplayed it, and you’ve got to give credit to Harper that he took second base on it.” Atlanta Manager, Fredi Gonzalez

Atlanta has been suffering from droughts for well over five years. It is currently in moderate drought conditions and residents are under water use restrictions. It has even been ranked as the 12th riskiest drought city in America by one source. This drought is one manifestation of our changing climate.  The U.S. Global Change Research Program has studied climate change impacts and the future of drought in the Atlanta region and stated:

Decreased water availability is very likely to affect the region’s economy as well as its natural systems. Increasing temperatures and longer periods between rainfall events coupled with increased demand for water will result in decreased water availability. The 2007 water shortage in the Atlanta area created serious conflicts between three states, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (which operates the dam at Lake Lanier), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which is charged with protecting endangered species. Such competition for limited water supplies is expected to continue.

Not only does this extreme weather wreak havoc by causing baseballs to “snake” in the dry grass of Turner Field’s formerly verdant outfield, the hot and dry conditions that have been gripping Atlanta made the infield too dry and fast.  As a result, this year the grounds crew replaced the entire infield with a different turf capable of dealing with the climate extremes and slowing down the ball.  The ground crew chose a replacement turf grass called paspulum.  Paspulum is drought-resistant turf grass–in fact, a 2008 special issue of Greenskeeper International (See p. 39) highlights that paspulum is a turf of choice for dealing with rising temperatures as golf course managers confront the new rigors of climate change.

Even a simple baseball play can be viewed through the prism of climate change and the way it is forcing us to adapt our behavior, even in one of our of most beloved cultural institutions. Frankly, I’d have been happy if Bryce Harper had collected a single, the Nats won, and the Braves didn’t have to replace their entire infield. That said, the play served as a reminder that we need to take action on climate change now more than ever.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) just released proposed limits to the carbon pollution from new power plants. The new standards will, among other things, require new power plants to emit approximately 60% less of the carbon pollution that is contributing to climate change. Supporting these carbon pollution limits can help tackle the impacts of climate change that threaten to alter things like baseball and wildlife even more the in the future.


http://blog.nwf.org/2012/06/bryce-harpers-unusual-hit-speaks-to-climate-change-impacts/


Offline HerndonNat

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How did these major leaguers ever make plays in high school?

Offline Coladar

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Totally off topic, but does anyone else think that Clinton in that picture looks *just* like Donal Logue? I mean I swore that was a still from some movie Logue was in set in the 70s, until I realized it was Hillary. Eerie resemblance there.

Offline Minty Fresh

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That's the dumbest thing I've read since the 9/11 truther conspiracies.

Offline JCA-CrystalCity

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The background of the first picture looks like the view across Broadway towards Davenport College.  Been there, done that.  Boolah, Boolah!

Personally, I blame Jane Fonda for the conditions at Turner Field.  Get divorced, and she gets even.

Offline mitlen

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Offline JCA-CrystalCity

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OK, so we are all in agreement: ridiculous to blame global warming, it must have been Jane Fonda.

Offline welch

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Wow. And all this time I had believed the Braves announcers, who blamed the RF for standing flat-footed, unready to make a play. Looked like Alfonso Soriano standing in LF at RFK, arms folded and counting his future money as the Nats pitcher threw.

Offline houston-nat

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:asplode:

Sounds like you'd be thrilled to learn that next year Jane Fonda is playing Nancy Reagan in a movie.

Offline mitlen

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Sounds like you'd be thrilled to learn that next year Jane Fonda is playing Nancy Reagan in a movie.

I think I'd miss the movie about Reagan no matter who played her.    I'm not much of a Reagan fan either.   :)

Offline Ali the Baseball Cat

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I blame Halliburton black ops for Bryce getting picked off at 3rd.

Offline JCA-CrystalCity

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Ball snakes in the grass?  I'm still with hollywood being responsible.  It was extras from Snakes on a Plane who caused this.

Offline Minty Fresh

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I blame Halliburton black ops for Bryce getting picked off at 3rd.

:lmao:

Offline houston-nat

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I think I'd miss the movie about Reagan no matter who played her.    I'm not much of a Reagan fan either.   :)


"The Butler"
starring Forest Whitaker as the presidential butler
Liam Neeson as LBJ
Matthew McConaughey as JFK
Minka Kelly as Jackie Kennedy
John Cusack as Richard Nixon
Alan Rickman as Ronald Reagan
Jane Fonda as Nancy Reagan
with Oprah Winfrey, Terrence Howard, Nicole Kidman and Lenny Kravitz

It sounds craptastic and I'm totally gonna watch it.

Offline PowerBoater69

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Noticed for the first time tonight that the 200 level conference rooms are named for ex-Presidents with Reagan being given the prime spot, nicely done.