Author Topic: Space. The Final Frontier.  (Read 14827 times)

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Offline cmdterps44

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Re: Space. The Final Frontier.
« Reply #350: November 30, 2012, 04:40:22 PM »
Thanks! That's why I was asking. I didn't know if there were some "theories" on what would happen. It's silly to "shrug" the question off. It's natural to have sex... I think it'd be even cooler to be on that list. It's better than the mile high club. It's like the 1000 mile high club.

The gravity thing is what intrigues me the most. Same with possible births on the Moon and Mars. It's like, would the baby be deformed/short lived/the same? It's crazy.

Offline Coladar

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Re: Space. The Final Frontier.
« Reply #351: November 30, 2012, 04:43:27 PM »
One way to find out.

Yeah, and it has to happen someday. But... we are at the point where sex in space equals 'damn them perverted geeks spending my tax dollars on pictures!'

We can't get past that. If we do, there is the far, far, far trickier issue to deal with: morality for the fetus. What happens when the baby is born either a freak mutation or dead, or kills the woman carrying it? If we can't even research sex in space now, I don't know how we can get past that other than private corporations doing research. Even then, it could evoke a crapstorm of historic proportions.

Offline cmdterps44

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Re: Space. The Final Frontier.
« Reply #352: November 30, 2012, 04:47:24 PM »
I feel the ethical issues of sex in space will hinder our advancement in space. I mean it definitely has an effect now, but imagine when (if) we get a nod to create a moon base or something. Who knows. It'll happen but "When" is the question. Just get it over with!

It sucks to put such a mother at risk, as well as the fetus, but you've gotta experiment to answer your hypothesis.

Offline Coladar

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Re: Space. The Final Frontier.
« Reply #353: November 30, 2012, 04:51:02 PM »
I feel the ethical issues of sex in space will hinder our advancement in space. I mean it definitely has an effect now, but imagine when (if) we get a nod to create a moon base or something. Who knows. It'll happen but "When" is the question. Just get it over with!

I worry I've exceeded my astronomy gushing for the year in one day, but... Yeah, if we are to advance, it is a fact of life. Better do it now than in fifty years when some mining outpost is set up on the moon privately and a bunch of rubes start getting pregnant with horrific consequences. Control it in LEO on the ISS. No better place or time. But considering we could easily create gravity AND shield radiation with a ring carrying our water supply, perhaps it is a question technology can allow us to skip.

Offline cmdterps44

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Re: Space. The Final Frontier.
« Reply #354: November 30, 2012, 04:54:01 PM »
True. Maybe there is some sort of "device" or room that could help maintain the proper development of a fetus. Dammit. JUST freakING EXPLORE ALREADY.

I want to be part of the age that advances into space. :(

Offline HalfSmokes

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Re: Space. The Final Frontier.
« Reply #355: November 30, 2012, 05:08:10 PM »
I wonder how hard/impossible it would be to 1) find a woman willing to take that risk with her child, and 2) convince her to continue to take that risk once she gets pregnant. 1 might be possible, even easy, 2 is another matter especially when the baby starts kicking and hormones start pumping.

Offline Vega

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Re: Space. The Final Frontier.
« Reply #356: November 30, 2012, 05:10:04 PM »
Dudes, they wouldn't immediately test pregnancy in space with humans. They'd start off with animals, like rats and chimps. Duh.

Offline HalfSmokes

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Re: Space. The Final Frontier.
« Reply #357: November 30, 2012, 05:12:09 PM »
Dudes, they wouldn't immediately test pregnancy in space with humans. They'd start off with animals, like rats and chimps. Duh.


according to wikipedia, they already have

Quote
Studies conducted on reproduction of mammals in microgravity include experiments with rats. Although the fetus developed properly once exposed to normal gravity, the rats that were reared in microgravity lacked the ability to right themselves.[12] Another study examined mouse embryo fertilization in microgravity. Although both groups resulted in healthy mice once implanted at normal gravity, the authors noted that the fertalization rate was lower for the embryos fertilized in microgravity than for those in normal gravity.[13] Currently no mice or rats have developed while in microgravity throughout the entire developmental cycle.[14]


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sex_in_space#Physiological_issues

Offline Coladar

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Re: Space. The Final Frontier.
« Reply #358: November 30, 2012, 05:14:56 PM »
Dudes, they wouldn't immediately test pregnancy in space with humans. They'd start off with animals, like rats and chimps. Duh.

Sort of exactly the problem I said. All well and good. A half century on and we still have nearly zero idea. The us pushes private development, but it'll come back to bite them in ass here. A half century. Nothing. We could see mining on the moon in twenty years. What happens when you've got an influx of idiots, little control, and they start screwing like rabbits? It shouldn't happen, but the way things are, it is exactly what will.

Offline imref

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Re: Space. The Final Frontier.
« Reply #359: November 30, 2012, 05:16:51 PM »
reportedly NASA did not find life on Mars, or even Methane.

Offline Coladar

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Re: Space. The Final Frontier.
« Reply #360: November 30, 2012, 05:17:30 PM »
according to wikipedia, they already have

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sex_in_space#Physiological_issues


You saved me the time... I figured they had to have done something. And look at how freaking little they have. Rats that can't right themselves to the complexity of humans? Uhh... That's a lot of research in between, and the time to do it in diminishes each day.

Offline Coladar

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Re: Space. The Final Frontier.
« Reply #361: November 30, 2012, 05:20:20 PM »
reportedly NASA did not find life on Mars, or even Methane.

It obviously wasn't going to be complex organics. But it isn't methane? That makes no sense. I have read as much as has been disseminated on the topic from those in the know, the official saying it wouldn't be earth shattering referenced Viking and Phoenix data. Aka. Methane. I can't even hazard a guess if it isn't methane. What, they found a molecule of water? Whee that's big news.

All that's left is carbon building blocks of life. Aka next to nothing. Nothing new, at least.

Offline Nathan

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Re: Space. The Final Frontier.
« Reply #362: November 30, 2012, 06:30:12 PM »
One way to find out.

What about that plane that you can go on that simulates weightlessness.  I think it's only 30 seconds at a time, but hell, who am I kidding, that's plenty of time.

Online blue911

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Re: Space. The Final Frontier.
« Reply #363: November 30, 2012, 06:57:05 PM »
What about that plane that you can go on that simulates weightlessness.  I think it's only 30 seconds at a time, but hell, who am I kidding, that's plenty of time.

Do her twice

Offline HalfSmokes

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Re: Space. The Final Frontier.
« Reply #364: November 30, 2012, 07:01:47 PM »
What about that plane that you can go on that simulates weightlessness.  I think it's only 30 seconds at a time, but hell, who am I kidding, that's plenty of time.


apparently, it's been done

Quote
This is one of the few pictures movies ever to be nominated for a Nebula Award. It's also the first pictures movie ever to be actually filmed in zero-G. According to Space.com:

The scene was filmed by flying an airplane to an altitude of 11,000 feet. The plane, containing performers Sylvia Saint and Nick Lang, then went into a steep dive, creating the momentary illusion of weightlessness.

Insiders described the filming process as particularly messy from a technical and logistical standpoint.

Budgeting constraints allowed Saint and Lang, who portray astronauts, only one shot at a perfect zero-G take, leaving the actors with only a narrow 20-second window of time in which to launch themselves toward one another and complete the scene.




http://io9.com/5686804/12-greatest-zero+gravity-sex-scenes-of-all-time-[nsfw]

Offline GburgNatsFan

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Re: Space. The Final Frontier.
« Reply #365: November 30, 2012, 07:21:27 PM »
It would have to be 15 seconds an hour or two off, 15 seconds...
Do her twice

Offline Coladar

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Re: Space. The Final Frontier.
« Reply #366: November 30, 2012, 07:30:07 PM »
Hmm... research time. Purely scientific, of course. Might take multiple viewings to grapple with the significant side effects of zero G sex, but I'll struggle through it for the benefit of mankind.

Speaking of, that brings to mind the perfect title for the second zero G pictureso. Zero G-Spot! Trademark pending.

Offline tomterp

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Re: Space. The Final Frontier.
« Reply #367: December 01, 2012, 05:31:04 PM »
Too true. Dealing with 200 obnoxious, self entitled idiots encroaching on your space and talking nonstop?

Needledicks every one.

Online mitlen

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Re: Space. The Final Frontier.
« Reply #368: December 01, 2012, 05:36:30 PM »
Needledicks every one.

God rest ye merry needledicks.   Let nothing ye dismay  ...

Online mitlen

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Re: Space. The Final Frontier.
« Reply #369: December 11, 2012, 09:51:22 PM »
Asteroid Toutatis is flyin' by around 10 PM.

http://events.slooh.com/

Offline Nathan

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Re: Space. The Final Frontier.
« Reply #370: December 11, 2012, 10:28:59 PM »
Can we see it without a telescope?  Or is it too late?

Online mitlen

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Re: Space. The Final Frontier.
« Reply #371: December 12, 2012, 08:12:14 AM »
Can we see it without a telescope?  Or is it too late?

Sorry for the delay  ...  It was a telescope event but it was fed through the aforementioned site.   That site does a lot of "tracking".


Offline Ali the Baseball Cat

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Re: Space. The Final Frontier.
« Reply #373: December 13, 2012, 01:03:43 PM »

Offline Nathan

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