Author Topic: A sobering realization  (Read 829 times)

BuckyHarris and 4 Guests are viewing this topic.

Online LoveAngelos

  • Posts: 766
Re: A sobering realization
« Reply #25: July 16, 2018, 10:15:14 AM »
I'm still amazed at all the focus on pitching when it's about the same in results as last year. It's the hitting that is off.

Nats team ERA this year is 3.90 versus 3.88 for all of last year. I will
Concede that relatively speaking it's not as good as compared to other teams. The league average has gone from about 4.30 to 4.10.

Yeah but the ERA since Roark and Gio went south to go along with the assortment of cannon fodder on the mound since Strasburg bowed out has to be near 5

Granted the hitting is also a major factor along with the absence of situational hitting strategy

Offline mitlen

  • Posts: 55867
  • We had 'em all the way.
Re: A sobering realization
« Reply #26: July 16, 2018, 10:20:31 AM »
Yeah but the ERA since Roark and Gio went south to go along with the assortment of cannon fodder on the mound since Strasburg bowed out has to be near 5

Granted the hitting is also a major factor along with the absence of situational hitting strategy

No doubt.    There's a lot to go around.     Serious question  ...  not using individuals as a metric, can anyone name a facet of the game the Nats are doin' well?     Pitching (starting and relieving), hitting (RISP, etc.), base running, throwing to bases, catching, fielding, etc.   

As a follow-up for individuals.    Who's the first half MVP?

I'm havin' a hard time thinking of anything that we're executing well at this time.   As far as the individual, I can go with Rendon.

Offline Natsinpwc

  • Posts: 11511
Re: A sobering realization
« Reply #27: July 16, 2018, 10:26:49 AM »
Yeah but the ERA since Roark and Gio went south to go along with the assortment of cannon fodder on the mound since Strasburg bowed out has to be near 5

Granted the hitting is also a major factor along with the absence of situational hitting strategy
Agree. Strasburg coming back will help. Don't forget Hellickson was out for a while also.

Offline mitlen

  • Posts: 55867
  • We had 'em all the way.
Re: A sobering realization
« Reply #28: July 16, 2018, 10:32:50 AM »
Strasburg coming back will help.

 :pray:

Offline aspenbubba

  • Posts: 4041
Re: A sobering realization
« Reply #29: July 16, 2018, 10:44:43 AM »

As a follow-up for individuals.    Who's the first half MVP?

I'm havin' a hard time thinking of anything that we're executing well at this time.   As far as the individual, I can go with Rendon.

Juan Soto. He essentially came up when Kendricks was lost for the season and performed at Howies level except for defense

Offline DCFan

  • Posts: 6555
  • What are you dense?
Re: A sobering realization
« Reply #30: July 16, 2018, 10:44:52 AM »
No doubt.    There's a lot to go around.     Serious question  ...  not using individuals as a metric, can anyone name a facet of the game the Nats are doin' well?     Pitching (starting and relieving), hitting (RISP, etc.), base running, throwing to bases, catching, fielding, etc.

Haven’t the relievers been doing pretty well? I can’t recall many blown saves of late.

Offline Natsinpwc

  • Posts: 11511
Re: A sobering realization
« Reply #31: July 16, 2018, 10:49:19 AM »
Haven’t the relievers been doing pretty well? I can’t recall many blown saves of late.
They struggled more early in the year. Now it's the starters.

Offline ChiliPalmer14

  • Posts: 306
  • Jim Rice? Nats?
Re: A sobering realization
« Reply #32: July 16, 2018, 02:51:29 PM »
They struggled more early in the year. Now it's the starters.

Yes.  Different parts of the team take turns making sure the losses pile up.  The neat thing about that is the frustration that must accumulate on the guys that've actually been good most of the time.  You know, Scherzer and...well, hardly anyone else.   

Offline Redhead

  • Posts: 1
Re: A sobering realization
« Reply #33: July 16, 2018, 07:17:22 PM »
My biggest problem with my attitude is, I'm a regular season guy. Give me a team that posts a winning season, and I'm smiling. To me, post-season play is a crap shoot, and the best teams in baseball go on to World Championships only 33% of the time. Dusty proved to me that he could win consistently. I was happy with both of his seasons. We are suffering the just desserts of Dusty's firing.
Couldn’t agree more. We gave up a proven MLB manager inDusty for a rookie and it shows

Re: A sobering realization
« Reply #34: July 17, 2018, 01:59:44 PM »
We may not overcome this hole and end up missing the postseason.  Or, we could have the injuries behind us, peak at the right time late, and ride the momentum into the postseason and actually advance.  Of course you'd prefer to coast to the NL East title, but, it might play to our favor to play meaninful games all 2nd half and have to scramble.  It's hard to turn the switch back on after coasting for months.  The Cubs were below .500 with the same deficit last year at the break. 

I'll trade all day the seasons winning 95+ games and winning the division by 20 games for actually winning a postseason series...or 3.  We've seen Wild Card teams get hot and win it like the Giants.  It's not always the best team for the 162 game regular season.  Often it isn't. 

Offline dracnal

  • Posts: 1122
Re: A sobering realization
« Reply #35: July 17, 2018, 04:52:43 PM »
We may not overcome this hole and end up missing the postseason.  Or, we could have the injuries behind us, peak at the right time late, and ride the momentum into the postseason and actually advance.  Of course you'd prefer to coast to the NL East title, but, it might play to our favor to play meaninful games all 2nd half and have to scramble.  It's hard to turn the switch back on after coasting for months.  The Cubs were below .500 with the same deficit last year at the break. 

I'll trade all day the seasons winning 95+ games and winning the division by 20 games for actually winning a postseason series...or 3.  We've seen Wild Card teams get hot and win it like the Giants.  It's not always the best team for the 162 game regular season.  Often it isn't.

I think coasting in the second half of September has been a major part of the problem. Once you take the foot off the gas and let the adrenaline fade, it's tougher to ramp back up to razor sharp.

Re: A sobering realization
« Reply #36: July 18, 2018, 12:36:53 PM »
I think coasting in the second half of September has been a major part of the problem. Once you take the foot off the gas and let the adrenaline fade, it's tougher to ramp back up to razor sharp.

I agree.  Like I said, you never would intentionally pass on having a great record and huge lead, but I think fighting for our playoff lives all 2nd half could prove to work better for us.

Online BuckyHarris

  • Posts: 187
  • Waiting for 1924
Re: A sobering realization
« Reply #37: Today at 08:34:17 AM »
All the observations on this thread seem thoughtful and valid (without the vituperation and personal clashes on other threads). I never minded rooting for the Senators, we knew what to expect. But a team supposedly destined for glory does this and you lose interest, seeing one badly played game after another and a DL that never ends.

So here's a piece that may deserve your comments. Excerpts below; the full article is at https://nyti.ms/2Nz7cjQ.

=====
Joe Sexton, NY Times, 18 July:
Hey, rooting for losers can feel oddly honorable, even vaguely valorous. But the Nats? They are the most soul-sucking strain of professional sports franchise. Not awful. Not great. Just tempting enough for suckers to believe they might be one or the other.

Start with Bryce Harper. The franchise player for the Nats. The guy looks great with his shirt off. With his shirt on, and a year before free agency, with hundreds of millions of future dollars at stake, he is hitting .214.

Monday night, Harper had what sure looked like a career moment when he won Major League Baseball’s Home Run Derby in front of an adoring crowd. But he’s Bryce Harper. And he plays for the Nationals. And it happened in Nationals Park, where all moments of even modest charm and promise go to die. Harper had barely completed his triumphant bat flip before reports surfaced that his exhibition victory might have been a genuinely rigged result, an allegation of some popularity in Washington these days.

Then there is Stephen Strasburg. He was such a surefire pitching prospect in 2010 that The New Yorker profiled him. Of course he blew his arm out in his rookie season, and this year — a now-or-perhaps-never year for the Nats — he has been on the disabled list since June. [Written before SS returned to suck majestically last night.]

There is, too, the team’s new manager, Dave Martinez, named before the season to supposedly put the Nats over the top. I covered Martinez as a player, and I ought to be able to remember a single distinctive thing he did or said. Of course I can’t because it only makes sense that the Nats, famous for not showing up in big spots, would choose to be led by an invisible former player.

The managing history gets worse. In 2011, Jim Riggleman up and quit on the Nats. His. Own. Team. Midseason. During a hot streak. Seems he wanted a contract extension, though he appeared to stress he wasn’t deluding himself, either. “I know I’m not Casey Stengel,” Riggleman said at the time. Few rushed to argue the point.

The Nats played their final series of the season’s first half against the Mets last week, one of the few teams actually more snakebit than the Nats. They could do no more than split four games, and so they enter the second half in third place in the National League East with a record that stands at a perfectly appropriate .500 — a living, lightly breathing embodiment of mediocrity.




Online LoveAngelos

  • Posts: 766
Re: A sobering realization
« Reply #38: Today at 10:23:52 AM »
My observation from last night at the stadium was the Braves came out to make a statement and the Nats just came out to play.

More of the same all around. Poor pitching;a hitter who hits a solo home run strikes out looking with a gagle of runners on the base paths where they remained until the final out.