Author Topic: gardening question  (Read 244 times)

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Online HalfSmokes

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gardening question
« Topic Start: August 22, 2010, 11:03:18 AM »
So I have the garden of death. the bed is formed by brick and is elevated and against my house (its about 14 inches by 12 feet). Its under a bay window and has pine trees towering over it so it never gets sun or rain. Because it touches my house and appears to have no drainage, I don't want something that I have to water much. I've tried a lot of low light, low water plants, all have died. At this point I'm thinking of covering it with small stones and putting moss on top. Does anyone know a plant that can live with little water and heavy shade?

Offline PANatsFan

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Re: gardening question
« Reply #1: August 22, 2010, 11:42:18 AM »
This is not an answer but another conundrum: The previous tenants at our house clearly never set foot outside, as there is old kudzu growth everywhere. The kudzu in the front has an impressive, tree-like root system, and I was able to get half out by digging at it. In the back, there was an impressive array that climbed up a 10-15 foot tree and was in a mass 6 feet wide. I had to wait for a bird nesting there to move out before taking it down. Some of the vines are an inch thick. Does anyone have a suggestion for killing the roots? I could get a spade and dig them out I suppose. I was worried the kudzu was killing the huge tree :shock: I don't want any chemical sprayed.

Offline Obed_Marsh

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Re: gardening question
« Reply #2: August 22, 2010, 11:50:48 AM »
So I have the garden of death.


Impatiens. Lancifolia. Moss. Vinca Minor. Creeping Yellow Jenny. Snowberry.


The previous tenants at our house clearly never set foot outside, as there is old kudzu growth everywhere.


You could burn them down and than attack the root crowns. You could get goats or lamas. Personally I'd just use the chemicals. Either way your probably still digging up root crowns.

http://www.ehow.com/how_2072149_kill-kudzu.html

Offline saltydad

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Re: gardening question
« Reply #3: August 22, 2010, 03:42:28 PM »
Put in Houttuynia cordata 'Chameleon', the Chameleon plant. It'll spread all over. Then you'll want to kill it.   :)


Online HalfSmokes

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Re: gardening question
« Reply #4: August 22, 2010, 03:45:21 PM »
Impatiens. Lancifolia. Moss. Vinca Minor. Creeping Yellow Jenny. Snowberry.



I just went to my gardening store, I decided to give the moss shake a shot. The previous owner left behind a lot of tile we don't want to I 'tiled' the bed, then smashed the tiled to get more interesting shapes and some height and spread the moss slurry. If all goes well, in 6 months I'll have a nice little moss bed

Offline PANatsFan

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Re: gardening question
« Reply #5: August 22, 2010, 04:52:31 PM »


You could burn them down and than attack the root crowns. You could get goats or lamas. Personally I'd just use the chemicals. Either way your probably still digging up root crowns.

http://www.ehow.com/how_2072149_kill-kudzu.html




I pulled down every last damn bit of it, except for the more established vines on the tree. I dug out half a root crown by hand, and for the rest I'll need to borrow a spade or something. It's not my house, but I have to take care of the hedges and I didn't want all that kudzu to bring a damn tree down. The main thing is I won't spend any money on it.

Online HalfSmokes

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Re: gardening question
« Reply #6: August 22, 2010, 05:54:11 PM »
Have you tried the kill everything Ortho

http://www.lowes.com/pd_283286-446-0430210_4294857254_?productId=3083301&Ntt=weed+killer&Ntk=i_products&pl=1&currentURL=/pl_Grass%2B_4294857254__s?Ntk=i_products$rpp=15$No=30$Ntt=weed%20killer

There is a milder version that only lasts a week of so. We used that to clear some persistent ivy- two applications did it.

Online HalfSmokes

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Re: gardening question
« Reply #7: June 06, 2012, 09:32:00 AM »
I have a japanese maple that I planted two years ago, it seemed to be doing fine until this year. It hasn't filled out at all and now it's got a green trunk (I think  it's missing bark, but I haven't seen any come off)








It was planted the same year my daughter was born, and keeping it alive means a lot to my wife and I- anyone have any idea what's wrong with it (I'm looking at you Salty- I've seen what you can do in the pond thread)?

Offline Mathguy

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Re: gardening question
« Reply #8: June 06, 2012, 09:59:09 AM »
I'd go see an expert at any greenhouse

I have a japanese maple that I planted two years ago, it seemed to be doing fine until this year. It hasn't filled out at all and now it's got a green trunk (I think  it's missing bark, but I haven't seen any come off)

(Image removed from quote.)

(Image removed from quote.)


(Image removed from quote.)

It was planted the same year my daughter was born, and keeping it alive means a lot to my wife and I- anyone have any idea what's wrong with it (I'm looking at you Salty- I've seen what you can do in the pond thread)?



Offline Obed_Marsh

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Re: gardening question
« Reply #9: June 06, 2012, 10:08:14 AM »
While an expert is advisable, personally I'd likely make sure the loichen/mold is not being watered by your sprinklers and apply a copper-sulfate fungicide to rid yourself of the green growth. Be certain to wear goggles, gloves; this stuff is toxic. Granted, the growth likely means lichen growth rate exceeds the rate of the bark, so it might be treating the symptom rather then the cause.

Given the personal importance of the tree though, a professional arboriculturist is likely a better idea.

Offline GburgNatsFan

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Re: gardening question
« Reply #10: June 06, 2012, 02:19:32 PM »
Driving a copper nail into a tree will kill it dead. I would be careful applying a copper containing product to a live tree. I don't know for a fact that copper sulfate will do any harm, but I have heard that copper is a problem for trees.

While an expert is advisable, personally I'd likely make sure the loichen/mold is not being watered by your sprinklers and apply a copper-sulfate fungicide to rid yourself of the green growth. Be certain to wear goggles, gloves; this stuff is toxic. Granted, the growth likely means lichen growth rate exceeds the rate of the bark, so it might be treating the symptom rather then the cause.

Given the personal importance of the tree though, a professional arboriculturist is likely a better idea.


Offline Obed_Marsh

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Re: gardening question
« Reply #11: June 06, 2012, 02:28:34 PM »
Copper-sulfate is commonly used and much safer and easier to handle than Lime sulfur. Don't believe me, Google it or pay an arboriculturist to tell you the same thing. Obviously you need to read the instructions and spray the indended variant for your type of tree.

Offline GburgNatsFan

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Re: gardening question
« Reply #12: June 06, 2012, 02:31:10 PM »
You seem to have more experience with this than me. I just heard the word copper, then reacted.
Copper-sulfate is commonly used and much safer and easier to handle than Lime sulfur. Don't believe me, Google it or pay an arboriculturist to tell you the same thing. Obviously you need to read the instructions and spray the indended variant for your type of tree.


Online HalfSmokes

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Re: gardening question
« Reply #13: June 06, 2012, 02:34:25 PM »
While an expert is advisable, personally I'd likely make sure the loichen/mold is not being watered by your sprinklers and apply a copper-sulfate fungicide to rid yourself of the green growth. Be certain to wear goggles, gloves; this stuff is toxic. Granted, the growth likely means lichen growth rate exceeds the rate of the bark, so it might be treating the symptom rather then the cause.

Given the personal importance of the tree though, a professional arboriculturist is likely a better idea.

I think at this point, I'm going to go to back to the place that sold it (hollywoods and vines great little store off t1 1) hope someone there can help

Offline Obed_Marsh

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Re: gardening question
« Reply #14: June 06, 2012, 02:42:54 PM »
Might work.

If you need a tree service, you can find ISA certified folks here.
http://www.treesaregood.com/findtreeservices/FindTreeCareService.aspx

Offline saltydad

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Re: gardening question
« Reply #15: June 06, 2012, 02:47:05 PM »
I'd agree that you should check with a pro. I haven't seen this problem with maples before, and I have a few.  Good luck, and post the results, please.

Offline comish4lif

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Re: gardening question
« Reply #16: June 06, 2012, 03:49:51 PM »
<---- has never seen a copper nail. Isn't copper on the soft side for a nail?


Driving a copper nail into a tree will kill it dead. I would be careful applying a copper containing product to a live tree. I don't know for a fact that copper sulfate will do any harm, but I have heard that copper is a problem for trees.




Offline GburgNatsFan

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Re: gardening question
« Reply #17: June 06, 2012, 06:42:01 PM »
Very soft, but they are used with copper building materials to avoid galvanic reactions.

You can still buy copper gutter spikes. They are also used for copper roofing (smaller ones). They're pretty easy to get.

A copper pipe would do the same thing.

<---- has never seen a copper nail. Isn't copper on the soft side for a nail?