Author Topic: Chevy Chase Bank Field at Byrd Stadium  (Read 2178 times)

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Offline El Kabong

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Chevy Chase Bank Field at Byrd Stadium
« Topic Start: August 24, 2006, 08:00:11 AM »
http://www.washingtontimes.com/sports/20060824-120724-8484r.htm

Not too crazy about corporate names, but at least they didn't have to get rid of the Byrd Stadium name.
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Terps bank on sponsor at Byrd

By Patrick Stevens
THE WASHINGTON TIMES
Published August 24, 2006
 
The Maryland athletic department and Chevy Chase Bank have agreed to a deal for the naming rights to the field at Byrd Stadium, sources familiar with the situation said yesterday. The agreement will permit the department to proceed with expansion plans for the stadium.
    The locally based bank will pay $20 million over 25 years as part of a deal expected to be announced today at an afternoon press conference. The first football game at the rechristened Chevy Chase Bank Field at Byrd Stadium will be Sept. 2 against William & Mary.
    The agreement is the second high-profile naming rights deal the university has entered into in less than seven years. Telecommunications titan Comcast agreed to a $20 million deal in January 2000 for the Terrapins' new basketball arena. Comcast Center played host to its first basketball game in November 2002.
    Chevy Chase Bank already has advertising signage in Byrd Stadium and has been a regular sponsor of athletic department events in recent years. It is the first company to purchase the naming rights to a football field in the ACC.
    The addition of a naming rights sponsor was critical to the expansion project. The University System of Maryland's Board of Regents approved a $35 million loan in June, providing much -- but not all -- of the money needed to expand Byrd.
    Although plans have not been finalized, the athletic department hopes to add between 50 and 60 luxury suites and 500 mezzanine seats, as well as renovate the press box. The expansion is expected to add between 2,000 and 3,000 seats.
    The addition will provide the department a much-needed source of cash and also help pay back the loan to the state. Maryland, Wake Forest and Duke are the only schools in the ACC that do not have luxury suites in their stadiums.
    Byrd's current permanent capacity is 48,055, although the school has placed temporary bleachers on the stadium's promenade since 2001 to increase official seating to 51,500. However, Maryland has topped 51,500 in attendance 14 times in the five seasons under Friedgen. Four of those games were last year, when the school set a per-game attendance record of 52,426.
    Sources said the next step is to hire a designer, which is expected to happen by October. It is anticipated the construction will occur in phases, with part of the renovation complete in time for the 2009 season and the entire project done by the start of the 2010 season.
    The department plans to extend Tyser Tower, which houses the press box and broadcast booths, on both sides to offset the field-length upper deck on the north side of the stadium. The upper deck added 12,000 seats and was constructed in time for the 1995 season, and it also was the last permanent seating addition to the facility.

Offline Dave B

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Chevy Chase Bank Field at Byrd Stadium
« Reply #1: August 24, 2006, 09:12:57 AM »
That is such crap.  That is 800k per year.  What is the average Maryland tuition? 15k When you average in state and out of state students? That is 53 students per year.  Thats pretty insignificant in the grand scheme of things. By the time tuition doubles or quadruples in 25 years, it will be even more insignificant

Nats Bruin

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Chevy Chase Bank Field at Byrd Stadium
« Reply #2: August 24, 2006, 10:28:53 AM »
Chevy Chase Bank Field @ Byrd Stadium????

 :?

Try Again folks!

ChestRockwell

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Chevy Chase Bank Field at Byrd Stadium
« Reply #3: August 24, 2006, 10:56:02 AM »
hi troll!

Does this mean I get free checking with my season tickets?

Offline 2k6nats

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Chevy Chase Bank Field at Byrd Stadium
« Reply #4: August 24, 2006, 11:08:05 AM »
Quote from: "ChestRockwell"
hi troll!

Does this mean I get free checking with my season tickets?


Its his first post?  Why the hell would you call him a troll?

w/e about the troll thing, I'm really getting sick of it.

Offline OldChelsea

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Chevy Chase Bank Field at Byrd Stadium
« Reply #5: August 24, 2006, 11:11:00 AM »
Quote from: "2k6nats"
Quote from: "ChestRockwell"
hi troll!

Does this mean I get free checking with my season tickets?


Its his first post?  Why the hell would you call him a troll?


He is the poster formerly known on these boards as DirtDogBaseball, and on the Washington Capitals official boards as caphcky and some 20-odd successor names (most recently NHLPlyXPly, under which username he was banned a few days ago). Several longtime Caps boards members (myself among them) post here and are quite familiar with the story.

Offline Dave B

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Chevy Chase Bank Field at Byrd Stadium
« Reply #6: August 24, 2006, 02:14:11 PM »
How the hell do you guys no this? Whoever it is doesnt seem to be trolling here.  I'm not defendiing him, just curious.

Nats Bruin

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Chevy Chase Bank Field at Byrd Stadium
« Reply #7: August 25, 2006, 11:01:15 AM »
They SOLD the naming rights to Byrd Stadium to make $$$.
If your going to keep the name of the stadium, why
SELL the rights? Its almost as stupid as The Los Angeles
Angels @ Anahiem

Offline OldChelsea

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Chevy Chase Bank Field at Byrd Stadium
« Reply #8: August 25, 2006, 11:18:06 AM »
Quote from: "Dave B"
How the hell do you guys no this? Whoever it is doesnt seem to be trolling here.  I'm not defendiing him, just curious.


His traditional technique in his two dozen or so Caps board appearances has been to start out slow and conversational but eventually 'out' himself as his prior persona (with all the emoticon showers - in fact he's the reason we're only allowed two emoticons per post on the Caps boards now), gets into cat-fights with other posters and then gets banned (as has already happened here once as DirtDogBaseball) - then will normally lay low for a bit then try to log on (sometimes unsuccessfully - one classic attempt was MsgBoard4shutins, using a favourite put-down of his) and start all over again.

The distinctive flavour tends to show fairly quickly - and now he seems to have just now come up with a third username for these boards: http://www.nationalsforum.net/profile.php?mode=viewprofile&u=335

Offline El Kabong

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Chevy Chase Bank Field at Byrd Stadium
« Reply #9: August 25, 2006, 02:09:48 PM »
http://www.baltimoresun.com/sports/college/football/bal-sp.schmuck25aug25,0,2104380.column?coll=bal-sports-headlines

Name change may be for Byrds, but Terps laughing to the bank

August 25, 2006

When I heard that the University of Maryland had sold the naming rights to the football field at Byrd Stadium, my initial reaction was probably the same as yours:

What did Admiral Byrd do to deserve this?

I mean, the guy risked his life to explore Antarctica and basically is the reason for America's long love affair with the penguin, but I guess the fact that there are no turtles at the South Pole allowed the Terrapins athletic department to rationalize its mercenary decision to name the field after Chevy Chase Bank for the tidy sum of $20 million.

Right now, I'm visualizing the great explorer, his toes probably falling off from the cold, wondering how the world would remember his tremendous sacrifice, and now you have the answer. Some so-so comedian starts his own bank and throws a bunch of money at Maryland athletic director Debbie Yow and, poof, an American hero is sacrificed on the altar of crass commercialism.

(Excuse me, but I've just been informed that Byrd Stadium actually is named after Harry C. "Curley" Byrd, who was the football coach at Maryland at the same time the admiral was flying his Ford monoplane over some of the last uncharted territory on the planet. And now somebody's telling me former Saturday Night Live star Chevy Chase has nothing whatsoever to do with the bank of the same name.)

Never mind.

No doubt, there are those who find the practice of selling naming rights to public facilities distasteful, and to them I can only say that it's no longer stylish to be a communist, especially when you're walking around with a $300 cell phone on your hip and your clothes cost more than the average Cuban heart surgeon earns in a year. Capitalism won the Cold War. Get over it.

I think they ought to sell the naming rights to anything with a wall big enough to handle the sign. It seems to work in Tokyo.

I'll admit that Chevy Chase Field at Byrd Stadium is a little bulky, but if that money allows the university to upgrade the stadium and install a beer tap in the press room, I don't think there'll be much debate in the media about it.

It becomes the third major Maryland sports facility to be named after a bank, which ought to tell you something about those checking fees that show up on your statement each month. M&T Bank jumped at the chance to assume the naming rights at our downtown football stadium and Ed Hale stamped the name of his 1st Mariner Bank on the side of the Baltimore Arena, leaving only Oriole Park without some kind of corporate name recognition.

Orioles owner Peter Angelos has resisted the temptation to auction the naming rights to the baseball park, though he is entitled to do so and they could be worth nine figures. I suppose he deserves some credit for that, but if exploiting the terrific national reputation of Oriole Park will put Carlos Lee and Roy Oswalt on the 2007 roster, I say Bank of America Park at Camden Yards has a nice ring to it.

There's a rumor floating around that The Sun tried to sell naming rights to Ray Frager's media column, but - for reasons no one can explain - Comedy Central wasn't interested.

The money from the Chevy Chase deal will help pay for the $51 million expansion of the football stadium, so I guess Yow deserves some credit. I know some of the bigger schools, including my favorite collegiate football program, would have used the money to buy free agents.

By the way, you can't spell SCHMUCK without U-S-C.

The whole corporate name issue is old news anyway. Ever since the Independence Bowl was renamed the Poulan/Weed Eater Independence Bowl, it has been pretty tough to shock anybody.

This week's funny headline from D.J. Gallo's SportsPickle.com, the sports humor site on the Web: Ravens receivers struggling to adjust to passes hitting them in the hands.

Offline El Kabong

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Chevy Chase Bank Field at Byrd Stadium
« Reply #10: August 25, 2006, 02:12:08 PM »
http://www.baltimoresun.com/sports/college/football/bal-sp.rights25aug25,0,4923570.story?coll=bal-sports-headlines

Field of green
Maryland's sale of naming rights at Byrd Stadium is part of growing practice as athletic programs strive to compete
 
By Bill Ordine
Sun reporter

August 25, 2006

When a new bank branch opens in the Twin Cities, it's possible that along with balloons and giveaway pens, customers will be greeted by Goldy the Gopher, the University of Minnesota mascot.

Appearances by the university mascot, spirit squad and football coach - as well as other considerations, such as access to names and addresses of hundreds of thousands of alumni and season-ticket holders for marketing purposes - are all part of a $35 million naming rights agreement between the school and TCF Bank. Minnesota's new, on-campus football stadium is expected to open in 2009.

The sale of naming rights to college athletic venues, while far less common than in the pro ranks, has become a growing practice as universities struggle to fund expensive sports programs.

The University of Maryland announced details yesterday of its $20 million, 25-year deal with Chevy Chase Bank to put the financial institution's name on the football field at Byrd Stadium, named after Harry C. "Curley" Byrd, the former university president, football coach and athlete.

"Athletic departments are going to go as far as they can in selling these rights in what has become the athletic arms race," said Dennis Howard, a professor in the University of Oregon's Warsaw Sports Marketing Center. "It's become increasingly competitive and expensive to compete."

Maryland joins a still short but growing list of universities that have sold naming rights to football facilities. More common have been deals involving basketball arenas, such as the University of Washington's Bank of America Arena, Taco Bell Arena at Boise State and Maryland's Comcast Center.

However, while colleges have emulated pro sports in tapping into corporate America for additional revenue, there's the obvious distinction between the two enterprises - profit and education.

"It's something that many universities struggle with because no one has enough money," said Jan Boxill, a senior lecturer and director of the Parr Center for Ethics at the University of North Carolina who has written a book on sports ethics.

Boxill pointed out that accepting money from generous donors or even businesses in exchange for agreeing to name buildings, lecture halls and academic programs after the benefactors is nothing new for colleges.

"I wouldn't have a problem with it but there are some issues to consider. What kind of strings come with the money? Universities have turned down money from donors when they wanted to have a say in hiring," Boxill said.

"And then there's the issue of who you accept as a sponsor. If Playboy wanted to sponsor a stadium, I wouldn't think that would be an appropriate sign. And finally, you have to be sure there's no conflict of interest that a university official isn't benefiting from the arrangement."

And there is the question of where sponsorship lines are drawn.

If a corporate logo is acceptable on the side of an arena or on a scoreboard, how about on a jersey or helmet, such as in auto racing.

NCAA spokesman Erik Christianson said NCAA regulations limit uniform and equipment logos to the manufacturer or distributor of the apparel or equipment being used. So a Nike swoosh can appear on a jersey made by that company but a soft drink emblem on the back would be forbidden.

As far as the nature of the corporate sponsor, say a beer company as opposed to a bank or cable company, Christianson said the NCAA urges member schools "to make sure [name sponsors] fall within the values of that university and higher education."

Maryland president C.D. Mote Jr. said Chevy Chase was an ideal partner because the company understood the school's position: that the stadium name would not change and the name of the field would not be displayed outside the structure.

"We're not going to confuse what stadium this is," Mote said. "We basically laid out the conditions we needed in order to do this project. ... It wasn't a normal negotiation where each side puts their interest on the table. We said what we needed, and we looked for someone to take it. They were the first people we talked to.

"Our fit together is natural and firm. Our partnership really is a model for how a leading company and a leading university can work together to promote higher education and help the community."

For some Maryland fans and alumni, the field naming rights deal was a palatable solution.

"To me, it sounds like a pretty good situation," said Garrett LeCron, an attorney who has been going to Maryland games since 1980. "It's a little different than the entire Comcast Center being named after a cable company. This way, you still maintain the tradition associated with Curley Byrd."

Fabian Jimenez, a Maryland alumnus and member of the Maryland Gridiron Network, said the deal was the most realistic way of nearing the estimated $50.8 million needed for renovations to Byrd Stadium.

"I feel much better that you have a corporation like Chevy Chase willing to help, versus telling students we're going to raise your tuition because part of this is going to go to athletics," he said.

Not every Terrapin fan agreed, though.

"I do not see how this is great for the university," said alumnus and season-ticket holder Joe Trocino, who favored a fund-raising drive among alumni rather than corporate sponsorship. "Great for the department of intercollegiate athletics, perhaps, but in what way does the university generally benefit? Do today's students benefit from this? More academic scholarships? New and/or renovated classrooms? Lower tuition?"

Although the practice of attaching corporate names to athletic facilities has picked up momentum in the past decade or so, it's certainly not new. In one case, that name - Chicago's Wrigley Field, identified with former owner William Wrigley Jr.'s chewing gum company - has become almost revered.

In contrast, some names, paid for by either a big donor or corporation, have become embarrassments. Villanova named its new basketball arena duPont Pavilion but then took it down when the benefactor, John duPont, was convicted of murder in 1997. The Houston Astros found themselves stuck with Enron Field when that company's scandal broke in 2002. The Astros paid just over $2 million to get out of the deal and the ballpark has a more wholesome ring to it now, Minute Maid Park.

For university athletic programs facing funding problems, both to keep revenue-producing sports competitive and to pay for athletic programs that generate little cash, the temptation is likely to grow stronger to partner with corporations desperate to cut through the advertising clutter of print, electronic and cyber media.

"It's further evidence of what people call advertising creep," said Andrew Rohm, a professor of marketing at Northeastern University. "Now we have the seventh-inning stretch brought to you by whoever. And for Chevy Chase in the case of Maryland, it's a way to get its name out as people tune out traditional advertising."

When Minnesota's new stadium opens in three years, it will represent a move from the Metrodome back onto campus, which is considered a big plus for students, fans and the school. But not everyone will be happy to be sitting in TCF Stadium, including Democratic state Sen. Larry Pogemiller, an alumnus whose district includes the university and who waged an unsuccessful fight against the naming rights sale.

Because Minnesota is a land grant school and the state's largest employer, Pogemiller said, it is an institution of greater significance.

"To me, to sell the naming rights," Pogemiller said, "seems to be sending the message that everything in your state is for sale."

Nats Bruin

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Chevy Chase Bank Field at Byrd Stadium
« Reply #11: August 25, 2006, 04:46:19 PM »
The problem is inconsistency. The school can sell the athletic program to the highest bidder but if a "student athlete" borrows a couple of bucks to eat, THATS an NCAA violation.
Hate the NCAA

Chevy Chase Bank Field at Byrd Stadium
« Reply #12: August 25, 2006, 05:58:43 PM »
Makes me dread the day we find out what the new Nats stadium is going to be called.  Who are we going to whore ourselves off to?

Nats Bruin

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Chevy Chase Bank Field at Byrd Stadium
« Reply #13: August 25, 2006, 06:40:07 PM »
Quote from: "Nat of the LivingDead"
Makes me dread the day we find out what the new Nats stadium is going to be called.  Who are we going to whore ourselves off to?


The Fridge votes for Nutri-system

ChestRockwell

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Chevy Chase Bank Field at Byrd Stadium
« Reply #14: August 28, 2006, 12:26:43 PM »
Don't care what they call it. Looking forward to the first game this weekend.

Oh and caphcky, I see you are still making of fun of Fridge for his weight.

Offline tomterp

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Chevy Chase Bank Field at Byrd Stadium
« Reply #15: September 01, 2006, 06:05:53 PM »
There's something in me that just doesn't like this.  But I generally give credit to Yow for leaving no stone unturned in pursuit of expanding, improving, and funding Md. sports.  Maryland has never had an AD this competent.

I will add that she has treated my parents great.  They have season tickets to football, and make modest contributions to the Terrapin club, but are by no means well healed or influencial or on the verge of donating big $ to the school.  But everytime they run into her, she not only greets them like old lost pals, but lavishes them with event tickets or other free stuff, even once inviting them to join her in her suite for a big Md. women's game, including pregame buffet, all gratis.  It means a lot to them that she values their modest contributions (though not modest to them) like she does the high rollers.

But isn't it only a matter of time before all schools are doing this?  I wish we weren't blazing the trail, but it's tough to compete, and it's imperative that Md. not stand pat.