Author Topic: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2009-2012)  (Read 44111 times)

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Offline PANatsFan

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #375: August 29, 2010, 10:55:11 PM »
I just need a good soup recipe, preferable one that I can throw in the crockpot tomorrow and let cook all day.  I have my beans soaking over night.



Offline Nathan

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #376: August 29, 2010, 11:17:22 PM »
Try this one. It worth grabbing the extras from a market or grocery. I only cook a fraction of the amounts but it comes out great.  :mg:

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/member/views/SMOKED-HAM-AND-WHITE-BEAN-SOUP-50029827
I decided to just wing it and pick up stuff from the store i thought would work well, just got home.

Surprisingly, I bought just about everything they call for except the potato.

Offline Ali the Baseball Cat

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #377: August 30, 2010, 06:11:17 PM »
I've never had Brunswick stew, but it sounds interesting.  Don't the trad recipes call for the addition of some kind of little critter (e.g. squirrel)? 

They do a lot of Brunswick Stew sales around here.

Offline bglide

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #378: August 30, 2010, 10:25:59 PM »
I've never had Brunswick stew, but it sounds interesting.  Don't the trad recipes call for the addition of some kind of little critter (e.g. squirrel)?  



Brunswick stew is amazing.  If you are ever in Statesboro, Georgia, there is a place called Vandy's that makes the best BWS I've ever had. 

Offline Nathan

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #379: August 30, 2010, 10:29:17 PM »
Squirrel is southern, rabbit is more the va style.

Offline Nathan

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #380: August 30, 2010, 10:31:13 PM »
BTW, my soup was ok.  It wasn't as thick as I would like.  Needed some more salt, maybe use chicken broth or something next time.  Plenty left over, soup is always better re heated I think :lol:

Offline Frau Mau

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #381: August 31, 2010, 03:10:38 PM »
ATBC made some awesome sauce last night using some spicy italian sausages from Whole Paycheck, nice thick savory tomato sauce with vidalia onions, garlic and green pepper. I can't wait to have some over some perfectly al dente penne....

Offline CJames0569

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #382: August 31, 2010, 03:44:54 PM »
So does anyone have any good camping or cooking over the fire recipies? I'm going to be spending 3 days and 2 nights with just my gf and I camping in the great outdoors with only a tent. I'm a pretty big outdoors/wilderness guy but this is her first time so I want to make it as nice as possible. Hopefully the restrooms/showers are clean  :lol:

Online blue911

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #383: August 31, 2010, 03:56:03 PM »
So does anyone have any good camping or cooking over the fire recipies? I'm going to be spending 3 days and 2 nights with just my gf and I camping in the great outdoors with only a tent. I'm a pretty big outdoors/wilderness guy but this is her first time so I want to make it as nice as possible. Hopefully the restrooms/showers are clean  :lol:

How are you cooking?  i.e. campfire,coleman stove,portable gas stove,etc...

Offline CJames0569

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #384: August 31, 2010, 04:01:40 PM »
I have the option of bringing either a camping gas stove, grill, or just cooking over the fire. My folks also have some iron pans or a dutch oven that I can borrow.

Offline Nathan

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #385: August 31, 2010, 04:02:55 PM »
Hobo dinner FTW.

Offline tomterp

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #386: August 31, 2010, 04:11:21 PM »
So does anyone have any good camping or cooking over the fire recipies? I'm going to be spending 3 days and 2 nights with just my gf and I camping in the great outdoors with only a tent. I'm a pretty big outdoors/wilderness guy but this is her first time so I want to make it as nice as possible. Hopefully the restrooms/showers are clean  :lol:

Ahead of time, make up some spaghetti sauce and just boil the pasta on-site.  Toasted baguette, candles and an Italian red and you're good to go.
I would not recommend the very similar but far more combustable chili, for such social situations.    :mg: Generally, though, things with sauces you can make ahead of time and pack frozen or in a cooler are a great staple of car camping (camping near your car).

If you have a grill, beef or other things that are okay to eat a bit raw are preferable to undercooked chicken.    :spaz:
If you have a large cast iron skillet (if you don't, get one), in the morning get some of those frozen shredded potatoes that have onion already in them, a bit of sausage, some eggs and cook it all together, then eat with tortillas.  Amish sausage and eggs if available.   :thumbs:

If you haven't practiced dutch oven cooking, now is not the time to start.  Some great recipies are available for dessert, like apple or peach cobbler, but you have to have the pot, then practice a recipe ahead of time.



Offline Ali the Baseball Cat

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #387: August 31, 2010, 04:18:31 PM »
That's essentially stew in foil, right?  A few friends and I biked halfway across the country (the group blew up in Illinois, so we never made it to Seattle).  Anyways, we cooked in foil over a campfire almost every night, except in some tiny town in West Virginia where the locals all showed up in the churchyard (where we had been given permission to camp) with masses of home-cooked food for us (and like 3 pies).     

Hobo dinner FTW.

Offline Nathan

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #388: August 31, 2010, 04:21:06 PM »
That's essentially stew in foil, right? 

Pretty much.  Meat, onions, potatoes, other veg.


Offline Ali the Baseball Cat

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #389: August 31, 2010, 04:22:22 PM »
That's good stuff.  Much more than the sum of its parts for some reason.  But so is everything cooked over fire.

Pretty much.  Meat, onions, potatoes, other veg.

(Image removed from quote.)

Offline Obed_Marsh

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #390: August 31, 2010, 04:45:45 PM »
I'd plan out the meals and snacks well in advance. Don't forget the deserts and drinks. I'd also double check yourself with one of the camping or backpacking checklists just to be sure.

Trader Joe's makes a lot of food which is perfect for the campsite. This guy went a bit overboard but you could easily go even longer with all the options there.

Grill something with a good rub over the fire. You just have to do this one. A man in the woods must grill. I usually go with steak with Argentinian or Brazilian spices. Kabobs usually rock too. They are also good because you can prepare them together.

Bring at least one of each meal you can prepare without the fire. IT could be a life saver if you stay in the tent and listen to the rain.

Also don't forget the coffee or tea if she drinks it. You can get it in bags like tea or get a camp stove espresso maker if you want to get fancy. While you are at it; some hot coco mixed with powered milk is handy.

Make at least one camping classic; probably smores or maybe roasting marshmallows. If she has never been camping, here is your chance to be iconic.

I heat Brie over the fire occasionally for Brie and crackers with the wine. You might want to practice this one first; it is rather easy to overcook/undercook/drop it in the fire which ruins the effect.

There are some good recipes here. Don't let the vegetarian part throw you, just adapt them to fit your tastes.

A Fork in the Trail: Mouthwatering Meals and Tempting Treats for the Backcountry

I'd also suggest grabbing a portable picnic kit and one of those blankets and taking a hike to one of the waterfalls or other scenic spot for lunch. I usually go with fresh Italian deli meats and cheeses from A. Litteri along with some artisan water and wine. If you go there, I'd also suggest some pizzelle cookies and quickly heat them by the fire after you get back.

Offline tomterp

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #391: August 31, 2010, 04:50:40 PM »
I'd plan out the meals and snacks well in advance. Don't forget the deserts and drinks. I'd also double check yourself with one of the camping or backpacking checklists just to be sure.

Trader Joe's makes a lot of food which is perfect for the campsite. This guy went a bit overboard but you could easily go even longer with all the options there.

Grill something with a good rub over the fire. You just have to do this one. A man in the woods must grill. I usually go with steak with Argentinian or Brazilian spices. Kabobs usually rock too. They are also good because you can prepare them together.

Also don't forget the coffee or tea if she drinks it. You can get it in bags like tea or get a camp stove espresso maker if you want to get fancy. While your at it some hot coco mixed with powered milk is handy.

Make at least one camping classic; probably smores or maybe roasting marshmallows. If she has never been camping, here is your chance to be iconic.

I heat Brie over the fire occasionally for Brie and crackers with the wine. You might want to practice this one first; it is rather easy to overcook/undercook/drop it in the fire which ruins the effect.

There are some good recipes here. Don't let the vegetarian part throw you, just adapt them to fit your tastes.

A Fork in the Trail: Mouthwatering Meals and Tempting Treats for the Backcountry

I'd also suggest grabbing a portable picnic kit and one of those blankets and taking a hike to one of the waterfalls or other scenic spot for lunch. I usually go with fresh Italian deli meats and cheeses from A. Litteri along with some artisan water and wine. If you go there, I'd also suggest some pizzelle cookies and quickly heat them by the fire after you get back.


Excellent advice.  I would add that the Starbucks Via instant coffee stands alone at the head of the class, in terms of quality for instant.  Tiny granules dissolve without need for filter, and weight nothing.  The backpacker's friend.

Offline Nathan

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #392: August 31, 2010, 04:51:10 PM »
Also don't forget the coffee or tea if she drinks it. You can get it in bags like tea or get a camp stove espresso maker if you want to get fancy. While your at it some hot coco mixed with powered milk is handy.
Man I had the "tea bag" type coffee when I was camping before.  I don't know why, but it was the best damn coffee I've ever had, even with saccharin tablets instead of sugar.  Maybe it's the fire thing like ATBC said.  Because I tried it at home and they suck.


Offline Nathan

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #393: August 31, 2010, 04:52:51 PM »
Excellent advice.  I would add that the Starbucks Via instant coffee stands alone at the head of the class, in terms of quality for instant.  Tiny granules dissolve without need for filter, and weight nothing.  The backpacker's friend.
Are they any good?  I've thought of buying some.  I've got a little Melitta pour-over that I use at work but it's just so damn messy.  I've thought about breaking down and buying another Bunn for work, the one I have at home is awesome.

Online HalfSmokes

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #394: August 31, 2010, 04:54:08 PM »
Are they any good?  I've thought of buying some.  I've got a little Melitta pour-over that I use at work but it's just so damn messy.  I've thought about breaking down and buying another Bunn for work, the one I have at home is awesome.

To me they don't really taste like coffee, but they are good when a coffee pot isn't available. 

Offline Obed_Marsh

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #395: August 31, 2010, 05:11:52 PM »
I bring an arsenal of coffee pots.

Camp side I bring one of these. I got one of these during a sale a few years ago so it looks a little different. I love the look of it sitting over the fire and you end up with the best coffee. I still bring instant packets as backup though.



For backpacking, I want to switch to a Handpresso. I have a portable espresso maker but it is awkward.



Offline Nathan

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #396: August 31, 2010, 05:18:53 PM »
They're like $100 though.

Offline Obed_Marsh

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #397: August 31, 2010, 05:26:51 PM »
I used to be hard core with the camping and backpacking. Add in Ragnarok (dagorhir), Pennsic (sca), and the occasional burn and I was camping a month or so a year. Go that often and it suddenly seems affordable.

Offline tomterp

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #398: August 31, 2010, 09:33:51 PM »
Are they any good?  I've thought of buying some.  I've got a little Melitta pour-over that I use at work but it's just so damn messy.  I've thought about breaking down and buying another Bunn for work, the one I have at home is awesome.

They are virtually indistinguishable from the real thing, but with the caveat that they don't stay fresh tasting for too long.  Even though they are vacuum packed, the tiny granules must begin to give it up.

Online imref

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #399: September 02, 2010, 11:06:03 PM »
(Image removed from quote.)


So does anyone have any good camping or cooking over the fire recipies? I'm going to be spending 3 days and 2 nights with just my gf and I camping in the great outdoors with only a tent. I'm a pretty big outdoors/wilderness guy but this is her first time so I want to make it as nice as possible. Hopefully the restrooms/showers are clean  :lol:


Hmmm, I took a cub scout outdoor leadership course a few weeks ago (I'm a webelos leader).  Here's a whole slew of resources:
http://www.scouter.com/compass/Scout_Skills/Cooking/

and

http://macscouter.com/cooking/

If you have a cast-iron crockpot you can eat well for several days.  Our favorite recipe is camp cobbler - take the pot, throw a can of fruit in there (pineapple or apples works well), dump in a box of yellow cake mix, then cover it with a stick of butter sliced into pats. Throw the whole thing on a fire for about 45 minutes (covered) and mix.  It's wonderful.