Author Topic: Food and How you Cook/Eat it (2009-2012)  (Read 44075 times)

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Offline blue911

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #1925: December 17, 2012, 06:12:05 AM »
That sounds really good.  I'm surprised at the veg shortening instead of butter, though.  I guess I always associate cookies with gobs of butter.

I use butter. Finding non-hydrogenated veg is  1) impossible and 2) a waste of time.

Offline tomterp

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #1926: December 17, 2012, 04:45:37 PM »
I use butter. Finding non-hydrogenated veg is  1) impossible and 2) a waste of time.

right.  Hydrogenated = bad.

Offline houston-nat

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #1927: December 17, 2012, 05:22:46 PM »
I have sodium nitrite on order so I can try curing my own bacon. Once it arrives, all I have to do is run to the store and buy 5 lbs of pork belly and get to work!

Hang on... I wonder if I have a bag big enough to put the meat in when it's curing.

Offline Ali the Baseball Cat

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #1928: December 17, 2012, 05:26:07 PM »
Trash bag?  Super XXXXL Ramses Thunderpecker jimmy hat? 

I have sodium nitrite on order so I can try curing my own bacon. Once it arrives, all I have to do is run to the store and buy 5 lbs of pork belly and get to work!

Hang on... I wonder if I have a bag big enough to put the meat in when it's curing.

Offline blue911

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #1929: December 17, 2012, 05:28:38 PM »
I have sodium nitrite on order so I can try curing my own bacon. Once it arrives, all I have to do is run to the store and buy 5 lbs of pork belly and get to work!

Hang on... I wonder if I have a bag big enough to put the meat in when it's curing.

Ziploc makes 3 gallon bags you can buy on Amazon.

Offline Ali the Baseball Cat

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #1930: December 17, 2012, 05:30:17 PM »
How long does it need to cure?

Offline imref

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #1931: December 17, 2012, 06:05:54 PM »
I have sodium nitrite on order so I can try curing my own bacon. Once it arrives, all I have to do is run to the store and buy 5 lbs of pork belly and get to work!

Hang on... I wonder if I have a bag big enough to put the meat in when it's curing.


there's a good eats episode on how to do this if you want to check it out.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/scrap-iron-chefs-bacon-recipe/index.html

Offline Nathan

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #1932: December 17, 2012, 06:19:21 PM »
I have sodium nitrite on order so I can try curing my own bacon. Once it arrives, all I have to do is run to the store and buy 5 lbs of pork belly and get to work!

Hang on... I wonder if I have a bag big enough to put the meat in when it's curing.

I'll PM you my shipping address :P

Offline houston-nat

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #1933: December 17, 2012, 06:23:26 PM »
How long does it need to cure?
It cures for 7 days. And it does say to use a 3 gallon Ziploc bag.

I'm using the savory cure from Michael Ruhlman, which calls for garlic cloves, black and red pepper, salt, and brown sugar. Oh and bay leaves, I need to get those.

pp. 35-37


Offline lastobjective

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #1934: December 17, 2012, 06:42:14 PM »
Ooh, nice! I don't know if this applies to curing but when it comes to canning and drying meats, you really need to follow the instructions down to the T. They're been time tested and the recipes that have survived come from the ones who actually survived their canning and preservation!

Which reminds me, I really want to can next summer... we canned a ton of jalapeneos from this summer.

Offline Nathan

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #1935: December 17, 2012, 06:47:26 PM »
My great-grandmother used to can the hell out of stuff.  I swear she was prepared for world war 3 with the amount of stuff she would can every summer.  And she used to make the best damn pickles.  I miss those pickles :|

Offline lastobjective

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #1936: December 17, 2012, 07:33:34 PM »
My great-grandmother used to can the hell out of stuff.  I swear she was prepared for world war 3 with the amount of stuff she would can every summer.  And she used to make the best damn pickles.  I miss those pickles :|
I hope to become like your grandmother one day... gardening and preserving are awesome. My grandmother also has a ton of canned items in her basement, and it's awesome (though probably not as much as your gran). I love her pears - I don't really like pears raw but I love them canned!

I'm hoping to learn from her this summer. Good excuse to visit  :P

I also need to learn how to make spicy pickled radishes - it's an asian recipe and it's really awesome. I'll have to ask my friends' parents.

Offline blue911

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #1937: December 17, 2012, 09:42:43 PM »
It cures for 7 days. And it does say to use a 3 gallon Ziploc bag.

I'm using the savory cure from Michael Ruhlman, which calls for garlic cloves, black and red pepper, salt, and brown sugar. Oh and bay leaves, I need to get those.

pp. 35-37




That's a great book.

Offline Ali the Baseball Cat

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #1938: December 24, 2012, 05:08:02 PM »
Best Christmas Eve meal ever...burger with bleu cheese, bacon, fried egg, onion, and dijon.

Offline houston-nat

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #1939: December 24, 2012, 09:21:31 PM »
Best Christmas Eve meal ever...burger with bleu cheese, bacon, fried egg, onion, and dijon.


All Points Bulletin, Dunbarton Blue is one of the most amazing cheeses I've ever tasted. I got it for Christmas Eve and my family plowed through a quarter-pound of it with ease.

Quote
Dunbarton Blue, a blue-veined cheddar created by fourth-generation cheesemaker Chris Roelli, has, in just a couple of years, become this creamery's flagship product. Roelli makes only about 70 seven-pound wheels of his new cheese each week, but the buzz has been startling to this former commodity-cheese producer.

"I never in a million years would have dreamed that it would have legs like this," he says.

Although natural-rinded cheddars sometimes develop a few blue streaks naturally, usually from unintended cracks in the rind, Dunbarton Blue comes by its veins intentionally. Roelli inoculates the milk with Penicillium roqueforti and pierces the wheels when they are about a week old to create the air channels that allow the blue to grow.

That's standard procedure. What's not standard is that he presses the wheels, a step that even Roelli describes as "unheard of" for blue cheese. Pressing compacts the texture, making it harder for the mold to find airways, but that's how Roelli keeps the veining under control and the flavors more approachable.

The Dunbarton Blue I sampled had a thin natural rind with plentiful mold and a golden interior, with just a little bluing near the edge. The texture was dense, compact and sturdy, like English cheddars but drier. It smelled of bacon and mushrooms, meaty aromas that signal a cheese with high umami, and the flavors nicely balanced sweet with salty.

http://www.sfgate.com/food/cheesecourse/article/Dunbarton-Blue-a-blue-veined-cheddar-takes-off-3245603.php



Offline imref

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #1940: December 24, 2012, 10:10:25 PM »
saurbraten tomorrow, along with homemade pretzels, celery root mashed potatoes, and sautéed green beans.

Offline lastobjective

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #1941: December 24, 2012, 11:14:17 PM »
All I'm making is lots and lots of breakfast food for brunch. I get crepe, pancake and egg duty...

Offline saltydad

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #1942: December 24, 2012, 11:24:54 PM »
I found 3 gallon bags at my Giant in Wheaton.

Offline Ali the Baseball Cat

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #1943: December 25, 2012, 12:31:42 PM »
That looks really good.  Stilton is one of my all-time faves...I'll be curious to see how they compare. 

All Points Bulletin, Dunbarton Blue is one of the most amazing cheeses I've ever tasted. I got it for Christmas Eve and my family plowed through a quarter-pound of it with ease.

(Image removed from quote.)

Offline Terpfan76

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #1944: December 25, 2012, 12:42:06 PM »
Homemade sausage gravy and biscuits for birthday/Christmas breakfast... YUM

Offline Ali the Baseball Cat

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #1945: December 25, 2012, 09:50:09 PM »
Caramalised pear cake in the oven right now...once it cools, I'm going to pour a lot of rum all over it and then seal it in with a nice butter glace.  Breakfast of Champions!

Offline imref

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Re: Food and How you Cook/Eat it.
« Reply #1946: December 26, 2012, 12:37:04 AM »
sauerbraten came out really good, as did the homemade pretzels even though I still can't get brave enough to use lye on my own.

Continued at "Food and how you cook/eat it (2013)"

http://www.wnff.net/index.php?topic=30248.0