Author Topic: the MLB Network thread.  (Read 25500 times)

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Offline KnorrForYourMoney

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Re: the MLB Network thread.
« Reply #275: July 27, 2011, 06:05:07 PM »
Billy Ripken is probably the absolute worst analyst / studio personality of all time.  I just don't know where to begin. 

He's like a sheet of drywall.  No idea why they hired him.

I just watched my first episode of "Intentional Talk" with Chris Rose and Kevin Millar.  I feel dumber for having watched it.  Terrible.

I avoid watching it like the plague.  Anything with Kevin Millar... :spaz:

Offline Minty Fresh

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Re: the MLB Network thread.
« Reply #276: July 27, 2011, 06:09:00 PM »
I avoid watching it like the plague.  Anything with Kevin Millar... :spaz:

I think it is Millar the more I digest what happened to me.  Rose isn't THAT bad.

Online DPMOmaha

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Re: the MLB Network thread.
« Reply #277: September 02, 2011, 07:16:11 PM »
Brian Kenny is leaving ESPN.  Speculation is trending towards him making a move to MLB Network.

Offline UMDNats

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Re: the MLB Network thread.
« Reply #278: September 02, 2011, 09:07:29 PM »
Brian Kenny is leaving ESPN.  Speculation is trending towards him making a move to MLB Network.

Good to see some quality people are getting the freak out of ESPN. Kenny is good.

It's just too bad that Sportscenter is becoming even worse than it already is. God, it sucks. So bad. 

Online spidernat

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Re: the MLB Network thread.
« Reply #279: September 02, 2011, 09:12:55 PM »
Good to see some quality people are getting the freak out of ESPN. Kenny is good.

It's just too bad that Sportscenter is becoming even worse than it already is. God, it sucks. So bad. 

Wasn't there a time when you aspired to work at ESPN?

Offline saltydad

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Re: the MLB Network thread.
« Reply #280: September 03, 2011, 12:00:53 AM »
hooray! Dish now has MLBNetwork and in HD!!! Now all we need is MASN in HD.

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Re: the MLB Network thread.
« Reply #281: September 10, 2011, 12:02:02 AM »
Greg Amsinger is the most annoying sock puppet in all of sports.

Offline Lintyfresh85

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Re: the MLB Network thread.
« Reply #282: September 10, 2011, 01:08:13 AM »
I really like him.

Brings great energy to the set.

:shrug:

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Re: the MLB Network thread.
« Reply #283: September 10, 2011, 02:00:16 AM »
It's a frantic, unnerving energy...like he's on meth.

Online DPMOmaha

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Re: the MLB Network thread.
« Reply #284: September 14, 2011, 01:46:18 PM »
As speculated, Brian Kenney will be joining the MLB Network beginning on Monday.

http://mlbnetwork.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20110914&content_id=24676986&vkey&c_id=mlb

Offline The Chief

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Re: the MLB Network thread.
« Reply #285: September 15, 2011, 05:52:09 PM »
Kevin Millar just got done talking about how he only ever washed his jock, but not his cup.  He just replaced that "every few weeks"

NO idea about the context of that conversation :shock: :lol:

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Re: the MLB Network thread.
« Reply #286: September 16, 2011, 02:31:05 PM »
Kevin Millar just got done talking about how he only ever washed his jock, but not his cup.  He just replaced that "every few weeks"

NO idea about the context of that conversation :shock: :lol:

Probably that Jim Leyland said he'd neither wash nor change his underwear as long as the Tigers' win streak was going.  It mercifully ended last night.

Online DPMOmaha

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Re: the MLB Network thread.
« Reply #287: October 31, 2011, 12:51:41 PM »
I enjoyed this time of year last year where they replayed all the "Plays of the Months" and came out with the Top Moments/catches/comebacks/etc... shows.  Those start up this week.  Also, saw they're going to be airing the Taiwan Series and a handful of AZ Fall league games.  I'd imagine there will be several games featuring Harper, all the listing say Teams TBA, at this point, though.

Offline Minty Fresh

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Re: the MLB Network thread.
« Reply #288: November 14, 2011, 07:42:58 PM »
For those of you more inclined to advanced stats/metrics:  Clubhouse Confidential hosted by Brian Kenney is a show for you.  In the first five minutes I saw Kenney liberally utilize:  WAR, FIP and BABIP.

Stat geeks rise up!

Offline HalfSmokes

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Re: the MLB Network thread.
« Reply #289: November 14, 2011, 07:43:32 PM »
For those of you more inclined to advanced stats/metrics:  Clubhouse Confidential hosted by Brian Kenney is a show for you.  In the first five minutes I saw Kenney liberally utilize:  WAR, FIP and BABIP.

Stat geeks rise up!

you and your fancy sports tier package

Offline Kevrock

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Re: the MLB Network thread.
« Reply #290: November 14, 2011, 07:59:16 PM »
For those of you more inclined to advanced stats/metrics:  Clubhouse Confidential hosted by Brian Kenney is a show for you.  In the first five minutes I saw Kenney liberally utilize:  WAR, FIP and BABIP.

Stat geeks rise up!

Nice.

I wouldn't call myself a huge stat geek, but I don't think it takes a stat geek to appreciate stats/sabermetrics and what they bring to the game. Advanced stats are not mentioned enough by game crews and the major networks.

Offline Minty Fresh

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Re: the MLB Network thread.
« Reply #291: November 14, 2011, 10:29:03 PM »
Nice.

I wouldn't call myself a huge stat geek, but I don't think it takes a stat geek to appreciate stats/sabermetrics and what they bring to the game. Advanced stats are not mentioned enough by game crews and the major networks.

Well Clubhouse Confidential was a half-hour of migraine inducing wOBA and such.  I need to defragment after that show.  My head nearly :asplode:

Offline tomterp

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Re: the MLB Network thread.
« Reply #292: November 14, 2011, 10:42:54 PM »
For those of you more inclined to advanced stats/metrics:  Clubhouse Confidential hosted by Brian Kenney is a show for you.  In the first five minutes I saw Kenney liberally utilize:  WAR, FIP and BABIP.

Stat geeks rise up!


By Derek Carty, Baseball Prospectus

Quote
Reviewing "Clubhouse Confidential"
 
by Derek Carty
 
Last Monday in this space, I interviewed Brian Kenny, host of MLB Network’s newest show, “Clubhouse Confidential,”in advance of the show’s premiere. If you haven’t heard of it yet, “Clubhouse Confidential” is a first-of-its-kind show that puts advanced statistics in the spotlight. Gone are the days of analyzing players using batting average and ERA, at least in MLBN’s 5:30 p.m. EST timeslot. With a week of shows in the books, I thought I’d take today to talk about what the show offers, what it lacks, and whether it’s worth your time to watch.
 
As I’m sure many people were, I was a little skeptical about how advanced analytics would translate from writing to television. While certainly possible, it needs to be done right in order to hold an audience’s attention—especially since on television, much of that audience is going to be unfamiliar with many of the stats and concepts. Kenny seems to be aware of this, since he makes sure to point out that “this isn’t math class” at the start of each show. Like he said in our interview, we’re still dealing with baseball, and it’s supposed to be fun. Intentions and reality are often two different things, but in this case, Kenny manages to it pull off, keeping the show light and fun while still engaging in intelligent analysis.
 
Each show begins with a brief synopsis of the day’s biggest news, leading into Kenny’s introduction of a topic that will recur throughout the show. This segment is called “High Heat,” which can be something that’s merely fun, like, “Is Albert Pujols the best free agent in history?”, or something that is controversial in the mainstream, like, “Is pitching the ninth inning different than the seventh or eighth?” Questions like the latter are great since they will bring common sabermetric principles into the spotlight. It means that the show is not just substituting OBP for batting average but, rather, examining important concepts that pertain to how the game is evaluated and played.
 
Whatever the topic happens to be, “High Heat” is the lynchpin that holds the entire show together. While it’s not the only thing that gets discussed on the show, everything manages to tie back to it. For example, with the ninth-inning question, most of the player analyses centered on free-agent closers like Ryan Madson, Jonathan Papelbon, and Heath Bell. When a guest comes on the show, they’ll discuss other things, but the guest will always voice their opinion about the day’s “High Heat” topic, and this really gives the show a tight feel with a strong sense of cohesiveness.
 
One of the show’s greatest strengths is its parade of guests. Each half-hour show boasts no fewer than three or four guests, from more mainstream beat writers like Ken Rosenthal and Tom Verducci, to sabermetric darlings like Bill James and Rob Neyer, to major-league managers and general managers like Josh Byrnes and Buck Showalter.
 
Some of the guests are less-than-sabermetrically-inclined (like Ruben Amaro Jr. and Showalter), and some say some flat-out stupid things (like Harold Reynolds railing against OBP, saying he would walk a heyday Jason Giambi “all day long” because all he’ll do is clog the bases), but this is something Kenny said he wanted from the get-go. Having disagreement keeps the show lively, and having multiple viewpoints portrays a sense of fairness. Additionally, for a show that (in many ways) is about correcting some of the misperceptions a mainstream audience has, it’s instructive to have someone like Reynolds on the show who holds these outdated and often incorrect beliefs as a means of teaching the audience why they’re wrong. Obviously it’s not made this explicit, and it may not even be intentional, but if both sides are presented, it will be easy for the thinking fans to reach the correct conclusion on their own.
 
No matter what, though, having such a strong slate of guests each show keeps things interesting. It’s not just Kenny standing up there spewing statspeak. We’re treated to a number of people that provide different voices and different perspectives, which breaks things up into bite-sized chunks and keeps the show moving along at a brisk pace. If you ask me, one of the most interesting thing one of the guests said during the first week of shows came when new Padres general manager Josh Byrnes talked about how his stat department looks at ball speed off the bat when evaluating hitters. This is something I’ve always wanted to get my hands on, and I imagine that the Padres are getting the information from HITf/x, showing that major-league teams are putting the system to good use. If only it were available to the general public…
 
Of course, not everything is sunshine and dandelions with “Clubhouse Confidential.” A new show—especially a groundbreaking one—is bound to hit a few road bumps along the way, and there are some things that someone who’s a hardcore sabermetrician or a devoted BP reader will pick up on that aren’t quite correct. On each show, “ClubhouseConfidential”takes a player who is either in the news or is a high-profile free agent and puts them through “The Shredder.” “The Shredder” looks at a player’s component stats to determine their value and what we might expect of them going forward. This is actually one of my favorite segments, but at the end of the segment, they show a three-year projection for the player, which always seem to be off. Take this one for Jose Reyes, for example:
 
Year     AVG   OBP   SLG
 
2012    0.277   0.325 0.310
2013    0.261   0.319 0.337
2014    0.275   0.337 0.418
 
It makes little sense that Reyes is expected to decline in 2013 and then improve so dramatically in 2014. I imagine this is a bug in CC’s projection system, because this 2013 decline/2014 improve pattern has presented itself in at least one component of every player that’s been run through “The Shredder.”
 
The show also makes questionable use of some stats, maybe choosing WHIP in lieu of ERA, which is a good first step, but it would be even better to use something like FIP since WHIP relies upon hits, which are largely out of a pitcher’s control. At one point, to illustrate Citi Field’s pitcher-friendly proclivity, the best parks in terms of HR/FB—which will be heavily influenced by the home team—were displayed as opposed to actual home-run park factors.
 
Despite having some things like this that will make a hardcore sabermetric follower raise an eyebrow, what I really like is that Kenny is constantly looking to improve and to learn more. We’ve exchanged a few e-mails since the show debuted, and when I raise points like these, he’s appreciative and vows to work with his research team to get better. This may actually be the show’s greatest strength: a host who seeks out people who are knowledgeable about a subject, asks for—and is receptive to—criticism, and makes adjustments. That’s the kind of thing that’s going to allow the show to succeed in the long-term. Naturally, Kenny doesn’t want the show to become too overwhelmingly complex—the need to appeal to the masses and not just the hardcore types is enormous—but he truly does want the show to be the best it can be, and that’s highly commendable.
 
Overall, I’ve found “Clubhouse Confidential” to be a very enjoyable show and one that I actually envision myself watching on a regular basis (the same can’t be said for any other baseball program currently on the air). The program remains interesting throughout, asks insightful questions, and Kenny is a tremendous fit as the host. No matter how the program turned out, it would have been a great step forward for the movement to bring analytics mainstream, and to its credit, it’s been far more than that. I’d highly recommend “Clubhouse Confidential,” and I look forward to seeing how it evolves. 
 
Derek Carty is an author of Baseball Prospectus. You can contact Derek by clicking here or click here to see Derek's other articles.

Offline Minty Fresh

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Re: the MLB Network thread.
« Reply #293: November 15, 2011, 07:42:33 AM »
The show also makes questionable use of some stats, maybe choosing WHIP in lieu of ERA, which is a good first step, but it would be even better to use something like FIP since WHIP relies upon hits, which are largely out of a pitcher’s control. At one point, to illustrate Citi Field’s pitcher-friendly proclivity, the best parks in terms of HR/FB—which will be heavily influenced by the home team—were displayed as opposed to actual home-run park factors.
 
Despite having some things like this that will make a hardcore sabermetric follower raise an eyebrow, what I really like is that Kenny is constantly looking to improve and to learn more. We’ve exchanged a few e-mails since the show debuted, and when I raise points like these, he’s appreciative and vows to work with his research team to get better. This may actually be the show’s greatest strength: a host who seeks out people who are knowledgeable about a subject, asks for—and is receptive to—criticism, and makes adjustments.

This part must be largely true because when comparing RoY candidates and breaking down the pitchers eligible, Kenny used FIP quite a lot.  It was an excellent exercise in showing that traditional stats made Hellickson the obvious choice but that some kid in Seattle (Pineda??) when using FIP made an excellent case for AL RoY. 

It was shortly after that when I demanded something be shown in wins and ERA before I started getting violent.  :lol:

However, I think this illustrates that Kenney is taking the job seriously and is looking to keep the show moving forward as the author states here.  I did notice that Kenney takes his time with each new stat he uses to describe (basically) what the stat is, how it's measured and why it's important.  It can be a bit encumbering at times but I would imagine it's necessary in the early episodes of the show in order to introduce its audience to these new calculations.

Intriguing show.

Offline blue911

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Re: the MLB Network thread.
« Reply #294: November 15, 2011, 07:59:50 AM »
Quote
Some of the guests are less-than-sabermetrically-inclined (like Ruben Amaro Jr. and Showalter), and some say some flat-out stupid things (like Harold Reynolds railing against OBP, saying he would walk a heyday Jason Giambi “all day long” because all he’ll do is clog the bases), but this is something Kenny said he wanted from the get-go. Having disagreement keeps the show lively, and having multiple viewpoints portrays a sense of fairness. Additionally, for a show that (in many ways) is about correcting some of the misperceptions a mainstream audience has, it’s instructive to have someone like Reynolds on the show who holds these outdated and often incorrect beliefs as a means of teaching the audience why they’re wrong. Obviously it’s not made this explicit, and it may not even be intentional, but if both sides are presented, it will be easy for the thinking fans to reach the correct conclusion on their own.

Here is where the stat guys fail. They can take one season in Giambi's prime and qualify that he was walked x amount of times and that resulted in y amount of runs scored. That would put an end to the clog the bases nonsense. But they (stat guys) seem to act as if this criticism isn't prevalent in some sectors of the baseball world. Debunk the myth, don't simply poo-poo it. The ancient Greeks proved the earth was round, yet it wasn't accepted by the main stream until after Magellan's voyage.

Offline JCA-CrystalCity

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Re: the MLB Network thread.
« Reply #295: November 15, 2011, 08:52:37 AM »
Quote
it’s instructive to have someone like Reynolds on the show who holds these outdated and often incorrect beliefs as a means of teaching the audience why they’re wrong.


This reminds me of the Python "Bruce" sketch, where new Bruce from the philosophy department of the University of Wallamalu is going to be teaching any of the great socialist philosophers "as long as he teaches that they were wrong."
Monty Python - Bruce



Offline Kevrock

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Re: the MLB Network thread.
« Reply #296: November 15, 2011, 09:08:16 AM »
Well Clubhouse Confidential was a half-hour of migraine inducing wOBA and such.  I need to defragment after that show.  My head nearly :asplode:

Yeah. Well, I'll check it out when I have a chance. Rather than an hour dedicated to just advanced stats, I'd love to see an advanced stats guy sitting in studio with all the baseball guys while games are going on. A balanced perspective would be nice.

Offline Minty Fresh

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Re: the MLB Network thread.
« Reply #297: November 15, 2011, 10:55:33 AM »
Here is where the stat guys fail. They can take one season in Giambi's prime and qualify that he was walked x amount of times and that resulted in y amount of runs scored. That would put an end to the clog the bases nonsense. But they (stat guys) seem to act as if this criticism isn't prevalent in some sectors of the baseball world. Debunk the myth, don't simply poo-poo it.

+1

A lack of smarm would be a nice touch.

Offline Minty Fresh

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Re: the MLB Network thread.
« Reply #298: November 15, 2011, 10:56:52 AM »
Yeah. Well, I'll check it out when I have a chance. Rather than an hour dedicated to just advanced stats, I'd love to see an advanced stats guy sitting in studio with all the baseball guys while games are going on. A balanced perspective would be nice.

100% agree there (as long as it isn't Bill James who comes across as a condescending prick in the television medium).

Offline Lintyfresh85

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Re: the MLB Network thread.
« Reply #299: November 15, 2011, 11:15:14 AM »
Clogging the bases is one of the dumbest arguments of all time.

Yes, who cares if a slow guy gets on base... he's only clogging the bases. It's not like it hurts our chances of winning or anything!